Pavilion architecture: the practices packing a big punch with small structures

The Rising designed by Francesco Librizzi for Brera Design District

The Rising
Architect: Francesco Librizzi
Location: Milan, Italy

The Brera Design District has a shiny new info point designed by Francesco Librizzi for aluminium brand DVNE. The pavilion transforms a street intersection into a square, making a space for pedestrians to gather and marking the entrance to the Brera Design District.

Photography: Alberto Moncada

The Rising designed by Francesco Librizzi for Brera Design District

The Rising
Architect: Francesco Librizzi
Location: Milan, Italy

The pavilion an urban intervention that shapes the use of public space and enjoys its scenographic location in the heart of Milan. Made of 3 mm-thick sheets anodised aluminium by DVNE, used commonly for architectural cladding, it creates shimmering chromatic and textural effects when interacting with light.

Photography: Alberto Moncada

The Rising designed by Francesco Librizzi for Brera Design District

The Rising
Architect: Francesco Librizzi
Location: Milan, Italy

The material of the pavilion, DVNE, is a Peraluman aluminum  surface that has a surface texture designed for interior and exterior use. The material is designed by Matteo Costa, who reached the design through layering, a series of chromatic applications and a surface grain achieved mechanically during cutting.

Photography: Alberto Moncada

Fifth Ring at Milan Design Week by MAD Architects

Fifth Ring
Architects: MAD Architects
Location: Milan, Italy

MAD Architects, led by Ma Yansong, has designed an immersive installation that creates a new dimension inside the courtyard of Milan’s historic Seminario Arcivescovile – a seminary built in 1564 for St. Carlo Borromeo. The floating circular ring inside the square of the courtyard stands as a ‘symbol of mankind’s continued search for perfection, while also defining a new dimension for the traditional courtyard’.

Fifth Ring at Milan Design Week by MAD Architects

Fifth Ring
Architects: MAD Architects
Location: Milan, Italy

On display from 16 – 28 April 2018, MAD Architects’ existential structure comprises an illuminated circle that hovers above a pool of water creating spectacular reflections – the lighting has been designed by Artemide and the engineering by Maco Technology.

Living Nature pavilion design by Carlo Ratti Associati and Studio Römer

Living Nature
Architect: Carlo Ratti Associati and Studio Römer
Location: Milan, Italy

Subtitled ‘a garden pavilion with the four seasons’, this structure ‘uses energy flow controls to allow spring, summer, autumn and winter to coexist under the same roof’ say the architects. Located in Piazza del Duomo for the duration of Milan Design Week (17 -25 April), the concept makes use of an innovative energy management system for climate control, with green spaces curated by Patrick Blanc and Flavio Pollano.

Living Nature pavilion design by Carlo Ratti Associati and Studio Römer

Living Nature
Architect: Carlo Ratti Associati and Studio Römer
Location: Milan, Italy

Spanning 500 sq m, the 5m high pavilion houses four climatic microcosms, corresponding to the four seasons, with each season displaying design objects by some of the most prestigious furniture brands, including Arper, Cappellini, Ethimo, Glas Italia, Kartell, Living Divani, Magis, Moroso. Each season corresponds to a new typology of space: the living room in spring, a picnic in summer, the office in autumn and the playroom in winter.

Living Nature pavilion design by Carlo Ratti Associati and Studio Römer

Living Nature
Architect: Carlo Ratti Associati and Studio Römer
Location: Milan, Italy

Embodying the values of Salone del Mobile’s 2018 manifesto for exploring a new relationship between nature and design, the pavilion will host a series of talks on nature and sustainability with an international array of speakers throughout its duration.

Baldacchino pavilion in Milan by Stanton Williams

Baldacchino
Architect: 
Stanton Williams
Location: Milan, Italy

Located at the Università degli Studi di Milano, one of three different locations for the Interni House in Motion exhibition, this experimental pavilion titled Baldacchino is a reference to the ornamental canopies above altars or thrones. Made of raw steel, chosen for its texture and materiality, the design is a response to the theme of the exhibition that focuses on residence, mobility, and transformable space within the home and the notion of nomadic, transient habitats. To animate the space, Stanton Williams also commissioned a dance performance choreographed by Thea Stanton to explore the relationship between the body and architecture.

Photography: Saverio Lombardi Vallauri

 

agrAir
Architect: Piuarch
Location: Milan, Italy

Located in the Brera Design District, this pavilion designed by Italian architecture practice Piuarch draws on the past to define the lifestyles of the future and expresses the values of tomorrow’s living spaces – lightness brightness and economy of resources. It’s design eliminates the boundaries between interior and exterior, and natural and artificial spaces. Across all projects, Piuarch focus on sustainability, the interaction between architecture and context and the relationship with art, use of natural materials and a focus on energy saving.

3D Printed house for Milan Design Week by CLS Architetti

3D Printed house
Architect: CLS Architetti
Location: Milan, Italy

Italian architect Massimiliano Locatelli of CLS Architetti has been working with Italcementi Heidelberg Cement Group, Arup and Cybe on a new project for Milan Design Week; a 3D-printed house, which will be built on site at Piazza Cesare Beccaria during the course of the fair. Creativity, sustainability, flexibility, affordability and rapidity are key areas to consider when 3D printing, says the architect.

Photography: Luca Rotondo

3D Printed house for Milan Design Week by CLS Architetti

3D Printed house
Architect: CLS Architetti
Location: Milan, Italy

‘My vision was to integrate new, more organic shapes in the surrounding landscapes or urban architecture. My intention was to do the first house for a square in the centre of Milan. I wanted to show a different way of using a printing machine and explore how a concrete house could create a dialogue with our memories of interior design, made of references to archetypes of the past,’ says Massimiliano Locatelli of the design.

Photography: Luca Rotondo

3D Printed house for Milan Design Week by CLS Architetti

3D Printed house
Architect: CLS Architetti
Location: Milan, Italy

Pictured here, the interior of the 3D printed house. Discussing the challenges and opportunities that 3D printing presents for architects, Locatelli says: ‘The challenges are the project’s five key values: creativity, sustainability, flexibility, affordability and rapidity. The opportunity is to be a protagonist of a new revolution in architecture.’

Photography: Luca Rotondo

NEST winter station by Ryerson University, Toronto

NEST
Architect: Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario
Location: Toronto, Canada

Adrian Chiu, Arnel Espanol, Henry Mai of Ryerson University in Toronto have contributed an upbeat pavilion to the Winter Stations International design competition that takes place each year on Toronto beach around the lifeguard stations – the seven Winter Stations were ‘riot-themed’ and each as colourful and creative as the next. The Ryerson University’s pavilion pictured is made of ‘modular cells that contain a weave of colourful webs’.

Photography: Khristel Stecher

NEST winter station by Ryerson University, Toronto

NEST
Architect: Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario
Location: Toronto, Canada

The NEST pavilion embodies ‘ideas of comfort within a system of disorder and complexity’ and is playful, yet also provides shelter. The young designers were inspired by political upheaval, continued global uncertainty and making a statement with colour and form on Toronto beach. Now in its fourth edition, the Winter Stations Design Competition was founded by RAW Design, Ferris + Associates, and Curio, the Winter Stations Design Competition as a way to inspire Torontonians to enjoy the beach in the winter.

Photography: Khristel Stecher

Treehouse pavilion by Studio Kyson, London

Treehouse Pavilion
Architect:
 Studio Kyson
Location: London, UK

Created as an exploration of classic architecture principles, such as form, light and texture, this ethereal pavilion was designed and built by emerging London-based architecture practice Studio Kyson. Headed by Scott Kyson, the architects worked on the pavilion playing with juxtapositions between solid and void, dark and light, and rough and smooth. 

Photography: Troy Hodgson of Darcstudio
Writer: Ellie Stathaki

Treehouse pavilion, Studio Kyson, London

Treehouse Pavilion
Architect:
 Studio Kyson
Location: London, UK

Clad in Japanese Shou Sugi Ban charred timber and smoked mirrors that reflect the surrounding leafy setting, Kyson envisioned a demountable structure that can be transported from site to site. It is currently nestled in the lush gardens of the architect’s own London abode, but plans are underway for it to be transported to a more permanent home. 

Photography: Troy Hodgson of Darcstudio
Writer: Ellie Stathaki

garden pavilion diogo aguiar studio, porto

Garden Pavilion
Architect: Diogo Aguiar Studio
Location: Porto, Portugal

Diogo Aguiar Studio’s ‘Garden pavilion’ installed at the Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art in Porto is part of a series of pavilions commissioned for the display of film in the exhibition titled ‘Live Uncertainty: An Exhibition after the 32nd Bienal de São Paulo’. The continuously curved pavilion constructed of timber planks is a shady cocoon for the viewing of a film by artist Gabriel Abrantes.

Photography: Fernando Guerra. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

garden pavilion diogo aguiar studio, porto

Garden Pavilion
Architect: Diogo Aguiar Studio
Location: Porto, Portugal

The façade of the circular pavilion transforms from exterior to interior, leading visitors within from three different entrance points. Inside, there are two concentric spaces, one interstitial and the other central, that flow together and create a natural control of light into the space where the film is shown.

Photography: Francisco Nogueira. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Liquid pavilion depA Architects, porto

Liquid Pavilion
Architect: depA Architects
Location: Porto, Portugal

Another pavilion commissioned by the Serralves Foundation in Porto, this pavilion designed by the Porto-based studio depA Architects is built of dark glass that reflects its leafy surroundings. The mysterious geometric form appears to float on a lake in the middle of Serralves Park, in proximity to the foundation’s contemporary art museum designed by Álvaro Siza and the art deco Serralves Villa.

Photography: José Campos

Liquid pavilion depA Architects, porto

Liquid Pavilion
Architect: depA Architects
Location: Porto, Portugal

The mirrored exterior walls enable the pavilion to build up a direct relationship with its surroundings and become a canvas for its context. Its shape is lifted from the architectural plan of the Serralves Museum, echoing the hexagonal matrix of one of its central spaces, a shape that is also featured in the landscaping of the park. Inside, the pavilion is neutral with stripped back interiors and is used as a space to display video work by artists O Peixe and Jonathas de Andrade.

Photography: José Campos

The People's Station, People's Architecture Office, china

The People’s Station
Architect: People’s Architecture Office
Location: Kwan-Yen district of Yantai, China

A new cultural centre for the community, conceived and built within just three months with a pre-fabricated construction system, has arrived in the Kwan-Yen district of Yantai in China. The People’s Station is an event space and a base for exploring the historic centre of the town in which it is located. Wide open entranceways and light-filled events spaces welcome members of the community inside, while upstairs there is a lounge, bookstore, cinema and outdoor terraces on each floor.

Photography: People’s Architecture Office, Zhu Rui. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

The People's Station, People's Architecture Office, china

The People’s Station
Architect: People’s Architecture Office
Location: Kwan-Yen district of Yantai, China

The organic and dynamic form is modular in appearance, with ‘portable appendages’. These ‘Tricycle Houses’ are event spaces on wheels that can transport the activities of the People’s Station around the town like satellites. The first event is an exhibition of the design work of the People’s Architecture Office, which includes projects that have informed The People’s Station itself, including projects such as the People’s Canopy, the Plugin Prefabricated System and the Tricycle House.

Photography: People’s Architecture Office, Zhu Rui. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Parteluz pavilion materia mexico

Parteluz
Architect:
Materia
Location: Mexico City, Mexico

Like many projects commissioned for Design Week Mexico (11-15 October), ‘Parteluz’, an elliptical pavilion by Mexico City-based firm Materia, was already under construction when an earthquake struck the city on 19 September. The emerging studio’s latticed structure of concrete and wood was meant to explore ‘void and mass’, or how ‘static’ building materials might interact with a “dynamic” material such as light, as Gustavo Carmona of Materia explains. But with structures flattened less than a mile from the installation site, in the gardens outside of Museo Tamayo, words in the project brief such as ‘dematerialization’ and ‘deconstruction’ took on new poignancy. 

Photography: Jaime Navarro. Writer: Su Wu

Parteluz pavilion materia mexico

Parteluz
Architect:
 Materia
Location: Mexico City, Mexico

For the architects, then, Materia’s pavilion among the trees of Chapultepec Park, the largest urban park in Latin America, became something like the city amidst recovery: an ‘in-between’ area neither fully interior nor exterior, explains Carmona, who founded Materia with Lisa Beltran in 2006. The firm’s projects, spanning nine countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, include the Louis Vuitton boutique in Mexico City. 

Photography: Jaime Navarro. Writer: Su Wu

Parteluz
Architect:
 Materia
Location: Mexico City, Mexico

Instead, in the demarcated sky, and in dissolving shadows cast by more than 70 white columns, is a filtered experience where the frames of a room can change in an instant, and where one realizes, perhaps, that the boundaries that separate us are porous, and we have always, as ever, been in the same space. ‘It was hard to restart the process after what happened,’ Carmona says, of finishing the open-air pavilion in the midst of a recovery and rescue effort that rallied many of the regions’ architects and designers. ‘But all of us seemed to see in it a symbolic way of rebuilding, of edifying not just our cities and towns, but of our characters. This is very Mexican, I would say.’

Tamayo DWM Project 2017: Parteluz is on display until March 2018

Photography: Jaime Navarro. Writer: Su Wu

Delgada 1
Architect: Camarim
Location: Delgada, Portugal

‘We tried to work only with fundamental architectural elements, coupling them in a way that is not classic or baroque, old or modern, but all of that in unison,’ say architects Camarim about the design of Delgada 1, a pergola and swimming pool structure designed for a family home located in a small hamlet 75km north of Lisbon.

Photography: Nelson Garrido. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Delgada 1
Architect: Camarim
Location: Delgada, Bombarral, Portugal, Camarim

Lisbon-based architecture studio Camarim, founded in 2007 by Vasco Matias Correia and Patrícia Ferreira de Sousa, was commissioned for the renovation of the house and the construction of an external pergola and swimming pool. Yet instead of seeing the project as a whole, the architects quite fearlessly separated the entities, designing a bold exterior structure that transcended the traditional style of the house.

Photography: Nelson Garrido. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Delgada 1
Architect: Camarim
Location: Delgada, Bombarral, Portugal, Camarim

While striking in its appearance, particularly in full sunlight when severe shadows are cast across the platform from the slim colonnades, the structure is also warm and inviting. Constructed of reinforced concrete and a pink marble from Estremoz that tints the water in the pool turquoise, the pergola runs parallel to the house and is sensitively placed between the trees with the swimming pool extending out towards the hills, vines, apple trees and pines in the south.

Photography: Nelson Garrido. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Martell Pavilion
Architect: SelgasCano
Location: Martell Foundation, Cognac, France

For their first architectural project in France, architects SelgasCano had to race against the clock. The Spanish duo had just six weeks to realise this organic, undulating structure in the courtyard of the Martell Foundation in Cognac, France. The 1,300 sq m protean structure forms a labyrinthine canopy between the art deco 1929 Gatehouse building and the 18th century wine cellars. ‘It’s a natural invasion – we wanted to break away from the linear perspective that connects the entrance to the founder’s house,’ the architects explain, ‘we wanted to create a contrasting form.’

Photography: Iwan Baan. Writer: Clara Le Fort

Martell Pavilion
Architect: SelgasCano
Location: Martell Foundation, Cognac, France

Commissioned to design a lightweight, free-standing ensemble for cultural events, the architects used a toolkit of elements including 43 porticos and eight different set of curved tubular structures. A wavy, translucent canopy of polyester and fibreglass, supplied by French manufacturer Onduline, defines the tone. Yellow water-filled inflated seats are randomly installed throughout, allowing visitors to sit, lean, stretch out or gather around site-specific cultural events. ‘The aim of the pavilion is for people to mingle, and attend a diverse programme of activities. A couple of bars and stands will welcome local producers during set market days and serve cocktails,’ says Nathalie Viot, head of the Martell Foundation, ‘I want the Foundation to be rooted in the local terroir, to source the best from the region and spin it into a broad, international dimension.’

Photography: Iwan Baan. Writer: Clara Le Fort

Martell Pavilion
Architect: SelgasCano
Location: Martell Foundation, Cognac, France

Staged like a series of translucent waves, the curvilinear pavilion is a maze. ‘We hope visitors will wander like in a forest, meander inside the structure’, say the architects. Finding ones way through the pavilion’s structure definitely creates expectations, if not creative encounters. Committed to its local community and environment, the Martell Foundation also explores new boundaries by reusing some of the wood from Vincent Lamouroux’s previous installation, Par nature (By nature). In 2018, the pavilion will be dismantled and reinstalled abroad within the framework of a social and community initiative.

Photography: Iwan Baan. Writer: Clara Le Fort

Renzo Piano Photography Pavilion
Architect: Renzo Piano
Location: Château La Coste, Provence, France

Sunken 6m into a 500 acre vineyard in Provence, Renzo Piano’s Photography Pavilion at Château La Coste opened with an exhibition titled ‘The Sea and the Mirror’, featuring eight photographs by Hiroshi Sugimoto from the Seascapes series. The 285 sq m pavilion will host photography exhibitions and also preserve wine within its cellars.

Photography: Stephane Aboudaram, We Are Contents. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Renzo Piano Photography Pavilion
Architect: Renzo Piano
Location: Château La Coste, Provence, France

Piano’s dynamic roof, lowered to ground level, is a focal point of the pavilion. It takes the form of a sail, connected with thin metal arches and alternating concrete ribs and glazing, which is anchored to the exposed concrete walls of the pavilion. At the back of the structure a concrete platform will provide a space for sculpture.

Photography: Stephane Aboudaram, We Are Contents. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Renzo Piano Photography Pavilion
Architect: Renzo Piano
Location: Château La Coste, Provence, France

Situated between Aix-En-Provence and the Luberon National Park, Château La Coste has attracted artists and architects from around the world to contribute to building up an open air architecture and art exhibition. A winemaking cellar has been designed by Jean Nouvel and an art centre by Tadao Ando, as well as art works on the site by Louise Bourgeouis and Jenny Holzer amongst others.

Photography: Stephane Aboudaram, We Are Contents. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Stonematters
Architect: AAU Anastas and GSA research lab at ENSA Paris-Malaquais
Location: Jericho, Palestine

In light of the decline of stone building in Palestine, where the material can be found in abundance, Bethlehem-based architecture practice AAU Anastas collaborated with the the GSA Lab of ENSA Paris-Malaquais to research and innovate stone building techniques by examining historic free-form stone vaults across Palestine. The Stonematters pavilion was born from this research and also part of an artists’ residency programme in Jericho.

Photography: Mikaela Burstow. Writer: Harriet Thorpe 

Stonematters
Architect: AAU Anastas and GSA research lab at ENSA Paris-Malaquais
Location: Jericho, Palestine

The structure, which spans a surface area of 60 sq m, has been built entirely out of 300 interlocking stones that are mutually supported. Part of the challenge for the team was that the materials and techniques were locally sourced from the city of Jericho. For example, a polystyrene construction support was roughly cut in a local factory and transported to another factory for a robotic carving process, which determined the specific shapes of the ‘bricks’.

Photography: Mikaela Burstow. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Stonematters
Architect: AAU Anastas and GSA research lab at ENSA Paris-Malaquais
Location: Jericho, Palestine

For AAU Anastas, the stone pavilion is a symbol of the urban history of Palestine and the role of stereotomy, the art of cutting and assembling stones, in that history, yet it is also a contemporary form that demonstrates new, sophisticated local construction techniques and an evolving social model of urbanism for the city.

Photography: Mikaela Burstow. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Dulwich Pavilion, ‘After Image’
Architect: IF_DO
Location: London, UK

Summer in London isn’t complete without a pavilion. While appearing blithe throughout the summer months, the Brits do rely on weather shielding structures in case of rain, and especially value a pavilion as beautiful as this contemporary, minimal form by London-based architecture studio IF_DO, which also conceals a bar within its reflective aluminium panels.

Photography: Joakim Boren. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Dulwich Pavilion, ‘After Image’
Architect: IF_DO
Location: London, UK

The design structurally reflects the dimensions of the Dulwich Picture Gallery, which was designed by Sir John Soane 200 years ago, while bringing a fresh aesthetic to the landscape through clean, contemporary materials. Commissioned by the London Festival of Architecture, in partnership with the Dulwich Picture Gallery and Almacantar, the Dulwich Pavilion will host talks, live music and events beneath its timber and mesh veil roof throughout the summer.

Photography: Joakim Boren. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

WAVE/CAVE
Architect: SHoP
Location: Milan, Italy

Reveling in the opportunity to work with traditional materials, SHoP collaborated with NBK Keramik to create this sculptural installation made of terracotta. As a part of the exhibition ‘Material Immaterial’ at the Università degli Studi di Milano, the pavilion is a contemplation on the meeting of authenticity, materiality and technology in design.

Photography: Tom Harris. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

WAVE/CAVE
Architect: SHoP
Location: Milan, Italy

Working with engineers Metalsigma Tunesi, SHoP built up 1,670 unglazed terracotta blocks into three tiers of adjoining flute shapes creating a honey-comb style form that its contemporary and traditional at once. The cream-coloured, decorative appearance of WAVE/CAVE sparks up a delightful conversation with the courtyard in which it sits.

Photography: Tom Harris. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

The Beacon
Architect:
JJS Arquitectura
Location: Woodbine Beach, Canada

Constructed from reclaimed wood with a weathered skin, the stoic form of The Beacon looks as if it has existed for years at Woodbine Beach, on the shore of Lake Ontario. It’s conical shape, designed by Joao Araujo Sousa & Joana Correia Silva of Porto-based JJS Arquitectura, is drawn from the abstracted essence of a traditional lighthouse.

Photography: Graeme Roy. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

The Beacon
Architect:
JJS Arquitectura
Location: Woodbine Beach, Canada

The Beacon encases a charity drop-off point inside for canned goods and clothes, serves as a community meeting point, and also acts as a shelter for a lifeguard. One of the winners of the annual ‘Winter Stations’ festival, the architects see the project as an opportunity to establish a permanent network of donation pavilions across Toronto.

Photography: Khristel Stecher. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Eclipse
Architect: FAHR 021.3
Location: Amor de Perdição Square, Porto

Injecting a pop of purple into the historic heart of Porto, Eclipse is a celebration of the Porto’s 20th anniversary as a Unesco World Heritage Site. Working at the intersection between art and architecture, local architecture practice founded by Filipa Frois Almeida and Hugo Reis, FAHR 021.3, designed the bold ball to inspire people to rethink the way they see the city. Advancing into the Amor de Perdição Square, where Eclipse is positioned slightly off-centre, the form appears solid yet moving closer the surface materialises as a web of three-dimensional holes – the 6m diameter orb is made of metal ventilation ducts which frame new visions of the 2000 year old urban centre.

Photography: Fernando Guerra (FG+SG). Writer: Harriet Thorpe

The Pod
Architect: Fathom Architects
Location: White City, London, UK

An oversized speaker has bowled up at White City Place, the former BBC Media Village, inside which is a studio space for recording podcasts. Creative agency dn&co asked Fathom Architects to design this moveable studio available for the public, businesses and brands to take their maiden voyage into the world of podcasting.

Photography: Tian Khee Siong. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

The Pod
Architect: Fathom Architects
Location: White City, London, UK

Based upon the shape of a speaker, the form is a ‘disrupted cube’ punched with circular windows resembling speaker cones that open the studio up to intrigued passersby. At 12 sq m in size, with enough room for six people inside, the pink and purple speaker is patterned with pixels generated from the world’s first radio transmission: ‘One, two, three, four. Is it snowing where you are Mr Thiessen?’

Photography: Tian Khee Siong. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

The Mirrored Sight
Architect: Li Hao
Location: Guizhou, China

Located on the north bank of the Longxi River – outside Longli in southeast Guizhou, China – architect Li Hao has constructed a permanent mirrored shelter made of bamboo.The pavilion, a place for leisure and contemplation, is covered with a skin of Pilkington Mirropane (a single-transparency glass) on the southern facade, which reflects the old town of a site established as an early Ming military settlement 600 years ago, culturally and architecturally unique from the surrounding area.

Photography: Kang Wei. Writer: Harriet Thorpe 

The Mirrored Sight
Architect: Li Hao
Location: Guizhou, China

Inside the double-level space, the upper floor is a pyramid-shaped viewing platform which opens up framed views of the landscape. Reached from the town by a well-trodden, historic stone bridge, the pavilion is like a gateway house marking entry to the natural environment. A cultural landmark for the relatively isolated community, it provides a unique experience for citizens and visitors.

Gulliver
Architect: Martin Rajniš
Location: DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, Prague

Floating over the courtyard of Prague’s DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, ‘Gulliver’ is the latest addition to the city’s booming cultural scene. Designed by Czech architect Martin Rajniš, the 42m-long steel and wooden structure, in the shape of an early 20th century airship, opened last week as a permanent new centre for literature. The architect used the shape of the airship as a symbolic reminder of a more optimistic time – of early 20th century technological progress and the artistic avant-garde. The actual structure connects both high-tech architecture and art events, hosted inside.

Photography: Jan Slavík and Petr Králík. Writer: Adam Štěch

Gulliver
Architect: Martin Rajniš
Location: DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, Prague

The 10m-wide ship, made of wooden planks and covered by a curved plastic shield, will serve as a space for reading and public discussions of literature – fiction, poetry and critical writing – related to the themes of DOX’s exhibitions, which typically offer a critical view of particular aspects of the contemporary human situation.

Parametric Glacier
Architect: DJA (Didzis Jaunzems Architecture)
Location: Riga, Latvia

For just 24 hours last September, this glacial pavilion was installed in the Riga Dome Cathedral’s garden as part of contemporary art forum White Night. Architect Didzis Jaunzems wanted to create a cool and contemporary pavilion to contrast the historic nature of the setting. Through the design, Jaunzems explored the two opposites of ‘naturalness’ and ‘artificiality’.

Photography: Uldis Lapins. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Parametric Glacier
Architect: DJA (Didzis Jaunzems Architecture)
Location: Riga, Latvia

Living in a world where humans have developed science so far as to predict, recreate and simulate nature itself, ‘Can the artificial world fully replace the natural world?’ he asked. The pavilion itself posited this question to audiences through its very materiality – which looked so natural, yet was completely artificial. The icy effect was achieved with thin plexiglass, of which half was made matte with a sanding machine, before light was projected from within.

Urban Clippings (Mirror in the Sky)
Architects: Jimenez Lai, Bureau Spectacular
Location: Taiwan, China

As part of last year’s Taipei Landscape Public Art Project, Jimenez Lai, founder and partner at architecture studio Bureau Spectacular, created ‘Urban Clippings (Mirror in the Sky)’. The temporary structure was a floating device through which to view the city, acting as a kaleidoscope; framing and reflecting the urban environment. Lai invited visitors to enter the structure to view the ‘clippings of the city’ and to see their own infinitely repeating form reflected into the environment like a ‘visual echo’. Looking to open a discourse on the individual and the city, Lai previously worked at MOS and OMA before founding Bureau Spectacular, an architectural practice which takes a multi-disciplinary approach to design. ‘Urban Clippings (Mirror in the Sky)’ was on view until 28 December 2016 at the intersection of Jiancheng Park at Chengde Road and Nanjing West Road in Taipei.

Photography: JD Huang. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

 

Eye_Beacon Pavilion
Architect: Ben van Berkel, UNStudio and MDT-tex
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Visitors will find themselves compelled to visit the Amsterdam Light Festival information booth designed by UNStudio. The pavilion omits a hypnotic glow, mimicking that of bioluminescent deep-sea creatures, who use pulsating light to attract and communicate with mates. Inspired by the ALF’s ‘biomimicry’ theme – ‘the imitation of natural phenomena for the purpose of solving complex human problems’ – the designers took the plunge and created a bold sculptural form constructed with 250 two- and three-dimensional tensile textile modules conceived by MDT-tex. Positioned in a patterned constellation, the overlapping modules enable the shape of the pavilion to twist dynamically between the two base cubes.

Photography: Janus van den Eijnden. Writer: Harriet Thorpe

Eye_Beacon Pavilion
Architect: Ben van Berkel, UNStudio and MDT-tex
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The soft glow of the form is created with LED lights supplied and installed by Zumtobel in consultation with Florian Licht of Licht & Soehne. These are projected out from the inside of the pavilion, evolving in a rolling gradient of colour. The ‘Eye_Beacon Pavilion is located on the western side of the Blauwbrug bridge, and will be on view until 22 January.

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