Theodor Bogler (1897-1968) German ceramicist and designer

Theodor Bogler (1897 – 1968) was a German ceramicist. 

Teapot 1923 by Theodor Bogler
Teapot 1923 by Theodor Bogler

Education

From 1919, he studied at the Bauhaus, Weimar and subsequently, the University of Munich.  

Biography

Between 1923-24 with Otto Lindig, Bogler shared the Production Workshop’s supervision, Dornburg, near Weimar, the ceramics annex of the Bauhaus. He designed a 1923 mocha machine in ceramics for serial production. In 1925, his commercial work for the Velten factory, lasting a little over a year, resulted in numerous designs. 

He became a Benedictine monk in 1932. Between 1934-38, he occasionally collaborated with the HB-Werkstatten of Hedwig Bollhagen, Marwitz, and, 1936-68, with Staatliche Majolika-Manufaktur Karlsruhe. 

He was the abbot of the monastery of Maria Laach 1939-48, worked on the production of numerous catalogues, books, and religious objects. His earthenware kitchen containers by Velten-Vordamm ceramic factory shown at the 1923 Bauhaus Exhibition. 

Works

Kitchen storage pot by Theodor Bogler (1923) MoMA
Kitchen storage pot by Theodor Bogler (1923) MoMA
Jug tin-glazed earthenware designed by Theodor Bogler 1925-26
Jug tin-glazed earthenware designed by Theodor Bogler 1925-26
Earthenware cup and saucer by Theodor Bogler 1923
Earthenware cup and saucer by Theodor Bogler 1923

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

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