Josef Pohl (1894 – 1975) Czech lighting designer

Office lamp, Adolf Joseph Pohl "Mother with a Child", circa 1900, bronze, antiques, Galeria Żak, lamp, lighting, old lamps, antiques Warsaw
Office lamp, Adolf Joseph Pohl “Mother with a Child”, circa 1900, bronze, antiques, Galeria Żak, lamp, lighting, old lamps, antiques Warsaw

Josef Pohl (1894 – 1975) was a Czech lighting designer. He designed the 1929 precursor of the adjustable lamp. Gerd Balzer produced his model. As part of its Kamden collection, Korting und Mathieson created a similar lamp. Pohl and others at the Bauhaus also executed the prototype adjustable wall lamp illustrated in Staaliches Bauhaus, Weimar and produced by Jucker. In 1932, Balzer and Pohl were given the task of coordinating Bauhaus students’ work, which culminated in a competition for conference and furniture design.

Josef Pohl 1872 Wien - 1930 Bad Deutsch-Altenburg
Josef Pohl 1872 Wien – 1930 Bad Deutsch-Altenburg

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

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