Lorinda Epply (1874 – 1951) American ceramicist

A Rookwood Pottery jardiniere (1920) designed by Lorinda Epply
A Rookwood Pottery jardiniere (1920) designed by Lorinda Epply

Lorinda Epply (1874 – 1951) was an American ceramicist. She was professionally active in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Education

She attended the Cincinnati Art Academy and Columbia University in New York, where she studied ceramics.

Biography

She worked at Rookwood Pottery in Cincinnati from 1904 to 1948. She created some of Rookwood’s most individualised work (with William Hentschel) in the late 1920s (with others at the pottery, she invented new glazes and types of ornamentation).

Hi-glaze ceramic vase (1933) designed by Lorinda Epply
Hi-glaze ceramic vase (1933) designed by Lorinda Epply
Porcelain vase (1929) for Rookwood Pottery designed by Lorinda Epply
Porcelain vase (1929) for Rookwood Pottery designed by Lorinda Epply
Vase (1918) designed by Lorinda Epply
Vase (1918) designed by Lorinda Epply

She represented Rookwood (along with Hentschel) at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s ‘American Industrial Art, Tenth Annual Exhibition of Current Manufactures Designed and Made in the United States .’ 1926-27.

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

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