A Celebration of Opening Title Sequences

From Patrick Willems, history and celebration/defence of movie opening title sequences. They have fallen out of favour over the past decade or two, but Willems argues they serve a needed purpose. For instance, opening title sequences can set the tone or theme of the film before it even gets started โ€” thatโ€™s what Saul Bass set out to do: Bass called this โ€œcreating a climate for the storyโ€.

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