Lapo Binazzi (b.1943) Italian Designer

Lapo Binazzi featured image
Lapo Binazzi featured image

Lap Binazzi (b.1943) is an Italian Designer born and professionally active in Florence.

Education

He studied architecture in Florence.

Biography

In 1967, he was instrumental in the formation of the design group UFO and part of the original group that established Architettura Radicale; in 1968 with UFO, created large-scale objects located in unlikely areas in Florence, known as ‘Transient Urbans’; in 1969, was active as an interior designer for various shops; wrote for journals, including Domus and Modo, and produced videos and films. His first architectural work was the 1971 house in Castel Rigone. In 1975, he founded an architecture and design studio in Florence, designing a number of lighting models, and designed ceramics for Eschanbach Porzellanen and silverware for Pampaloni. 

From 1968 with UFO, participated in exhibitions in Italy and abroad, including 1968 (XIV) and 1973 (XV) Triennali di Milano, 1971 Biennale de Paris, 1974 Contemporanea in Rome, 1976 International Biennale of Graphic Arts in Florence, 1978 Biennale di Venezia, 1981 New York ‘Design by Circumstances,’ 1978 Berlin ‘Design als postulat,’ and 1981 Hanover ‘Provakationen,’ 1987 Documenta 8 in Kassel. His work was the subject of a 1981 one-person exhibition at Alchimia in Florence.

Lapo Binazzi in our partner stores

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

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    In the early decades of the 20th century, Paul Poiret was a crucial figure in the French fashion industry, notably by adding a deep oriental flavour and rich colours to contemporary clothing. Read More →

  • Morton Sundour beautiful British furnishing fabrics

    Morton Sundour beautiful British furnishing fabrics

    It was founded in 1914, by Alexander Morton who reorganised his Alexander Morton and Company Ltd, with Morton Sundour as “the major off-shoot”. It was run by his second son James Morton.Read More →

  • Post-Impressionism – a concise guide

    Post-Impressionism – a concise guide

    Post-Impressionism (sometimes called Postimpressionism) was a significant French art trend that evolved between 1886 and 1905. Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, and Georges Seurat led the movement. Post-Impressionism was a reaction to Impressionism’s naturalistic light and colour. Post-Impressionism covers the work of Les Nabis, Neo-Impressionism, Symbolism, Cloisonnism, the Pont-Aven School, and Synthetism.Read More →

  • The Moka Express (Design Classic) – simple ☕ coffee making machine

    The Moka Express (Design Classic) – simple ☕ coffee making machine

    Designed and Made in Italy The Moka Express is a straightforward stovetop coffee maker. It unscrews in the centre, and water is poured into the bottom compartment. Read More →

  • Domus (1928) magazine devoted to design & architecture

    Domus (1928) magazine devoted to design & architecture

    Gio Ponti founded Domus in 1928, this journal devoted to architecture and design, originally named “L’ Arte della Casa,” has been at the forefront of design debate in Italy. In the 1930s, it was mainly concerned with a Novecento aesthetic, but it also paid attention to more radical tendencies, as Persico’s 1934 article “A New Start for Architecture” exemplifies. Read More →

  • Max Bill (1908 – 1994) – Swiss painter, sculptor, architect, designer, teacher, and writer

    Max Bill (1908 – 1994) – Swiss painter, sculptor, architect, designer, teacher, and writer

    Max Bill (1908 – 1994) was a Swiss painter, sculptor, architect, designer, teacher, and writer. He studied at the Bauhaus from 1927 to 1929, then returned to Switzerland, primarily in Zurich. He saw himself as primarily an architect, but he worked in several fields, with the ultimate goal of bringing the various branches of the visual arts together—he once described art as the “sum of all functions in harmonious unity.”Read More →

  • Praktika Tableware (1933) designed by Wilhelm Käge

    Praktika Tableware (1933) designed by Wilhelm Käge

    Praktika Tableware (1933) designed by Wilhelm Käge. White earthenware stacking dishes, oval with rounded sides.Read More →

  • Parker 51 Fountain Pen – The World’s Most Wanted Pen

    Parker 51 Fountain Pen – The World’s Most Wanted Pen

    This sleek, aerodynamic design with its recognisable hooded nib was the result of a research programme finished in 1939, and it was promoted as “a pen from another planet” and “ten years ahead of its time.” It was released to mark the Parker Company’s 51st anniversary in the United States and quickly rose to the top of the company’s best-selling models list (nearly 120 million units sold).Read More →

  • Amen Glasses – what are they?

    Amen Glasses – what are they?

    ‘Amen’ glasses gained their name from the Jacobite verses engraved on them, which invariably end with the word Amen.Read More →

  • František Zelenka (1896 – 1942) – Czech architect and stage and graphic designer.

    František Zelenka (1896 – 1942) – Czech architect and stage and graphic designer.

    František Zelenka (1896 – 1942) was a Czech architect and stage and graphic designer. He was born in Prague. Zelenka’s career in the theatre was initiated by K.H. Hilar, the National Theatre director in Prague in 1926.Read More →

  • Gino Valle (1923 – 2003) Italian architect, designer and town planner

    Gino Valle  (1923 – 2003) Italian architect, designer and town planner

    Gino Valle (1923 – 2003) was. Italian architect, designer, and town planner. He was born in Udine. He studied at the Instituto Universitario di Architettura, Venice, to 1948. From 1951, he was at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, Massachusetts.Read More →

  • Kurt Thut (1931 – 2011) Swiss Designer and Manufacturer

    Kurt Thut (1931 – 2011) Swiss Designer and Manufacturer

    Kurt Thut (b. 1931-2011) was born in Möriken, Switzerland. In his father’s workshop, while attending the School of Art and Design in Zurich, Thut improved his carpentry skills.Read More →

  • Marc Harrison (1936 – 1998) American Industrial designer

    Marc Harrison (1936 – 1998) American Industrial designer

    Marc Harrison (1936-1998) was an industrial designer from the United States. Harrison sustained a significant brain injury in a sledding accident when he was eleven years old. He had to relearn simple functions like walking and talking as a result of the crash. Harrison gained experience and motivation for his future work as an industrial designer due to this incident and his lengthy recovery.Read More →

  • Alhambra Table Fountain

    Alhambra Table Fountain

    Alhambra Table Fountain is a centrepiece in the form of a Moorish pavillion having a domed roof decorated with champleve enamelling and resting on a leafy base. The piece is in the style of the Alhambra, Granada, and is intended to represent a shrine covering a water-hole. On the base and encircling the edifice are figures in-the-round of three Arab horses that had been presented to Queen Victoria, and of their Arabian attendant, and nearby a African boy with a dog. Read More →

  • Pedestal Table inspired by 🏛️ classical architecture

    Pedestal Table inspired by 🏛️ classical architecture

    A pedestable table is originally the base support of a column, in classical architecture. A pedestal in furniture may have one of four definitions: Read More →

  • Flemming Eskildsen (b.1930) Danish designer and Silversmith

    Flemming Eskildsen (b.1930) Danish designer and Silversmith

    In 1958 Eskildsen joined the Georg Jensen design department making designs for flatware, jewellery and hollowware. He became the foreman of the design department in 1962.Read More →

  • Eureka Pottery – American Ceramics manufacturer

    Eureka Pottery – American Ceramics manufacturer

    The Eureka Pottery was the last commercial pottery constructed during the historic three decades during which potteries were established in Trenton. The company made the most beautiful majolica in Trenton. It was established in 1883 by Leon Weil, who Noah and Charles Boch succeeded. It was closed in 1887 due to fire, the constant enemy of potteries.Read More →

  • Lino Tagliapietra (b.1934) Italian Glassworker and Teacher

    Lino Tagliapietra (b.1934) Italian Glassworker and Teacher

    From 1956, Tagliapietra taught glassmaking with Archimede Seguso and Nane Ferro; 1966—68, designed glass for Venini, Murano; until 1968, for Murrina; from 1968, taught glassmaking at Haystack School and Pilchuck School, Stanwood, Washington. Read More →

  • Franco Deboni (b.1950) Italian architect and glassware designer

    Franco Deboni (b.1950) Italian architect and glassware designer

    He worked for various firms in Italy and Yugoslavia. He received a patent for a bookcase-component system. Clients included Ferro & Lazzarini (glassware) and Italianline. He was best known for his lighting in glass and a mushroom-shaped table lamp in marble; became a member of ADI (Associazione per il Disegno Industriale); was author of Venini Glass (1990) and the manager of an art auction house.Read More →

  • Atika (1987 – 1999) – Czech Design Group

    Atika (1987 – 1999) – Czech Design Group

    Formed in 1987, Atika was aligned with the Anti-Design orientation of Archizoom, Alchimia, and Memphis in Italy. One of its goals was to support Post-Modernism, seeking an outlet for experimentation and new means of expression. Its expressive language used signs of symbolic meanings that referred to nature, society, and urban destruction. Read More →

  • Geoffrey Harcourt (b.1935) British Furniture Designer

    Geoffrey Harcourt (b.1935) British Furniture Designer

    Between 1960-61, he worked at Latham, Tyler and Jensen, Chicago, and with Jacob Jensen in Copenhagen; in 1961, opened his studio in London, specialising in furniture design; from 1962; began designing seating for Artifort, the Netherlands, who produced more than 20 models of his furniture designsRead More →

  • Artifort Dutch furniture manufacturer

    Artifort Dutch furniture manufacturer

    Artifort used freelance designers, including Kho Liang Le and Pierre Paulin. It produced chairs, settees, and tables. It first used plastics in Paulin’s 1965 Chair 582 in tensioned rubber and latex foam and his 1965-66 Armchair 303 in polyester fibreglass. It produced Paulin’s 1953 Chair 157 in polyester, ABS, and elastomers and 1967 F577 chair. Read More →

  • Egmont Arens (1888 – 1966) American Industrial Designer

    Egmont Arens (1888 – 1966) American Industrial Designer

    In 1935 he founded his own design company. He designed everything from toys, boats, aircraft, kitchen appliances, lamps and lampshades, beer cans, plastic containers, cigarette lighters, jukeboxes, watches and baby carriages.Read More →

  • Fred G. Minuth (1884 – 1966) American Silversmith

    Fred G. Minuth (1884 – 1966)  American Silversmith

    Fred G. Minuth was an American Silversmith. He was professionally active in Chicago.Read More →

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