Gustave Miklos (1888 – 1967) Hungarian designer, sculptor and artist

Gustave Miklos Sculpture in Bronze 1927

Gustave Miklos (1888 – 1967) was a Hungarian designer, sculptor and artist.

Education

He studied at the School of Decorative Arts, Budapest and various institutions in Paris, including Ecole Speciale d’Architecture.

Biography

In the French army during World War I, he discovered the art of Greece and Byzantium. In Paris after the war, he met Jacques Doucet, for whom he designed silverware, enamels, tapestries and carpets for the residence on the avenue du Bois (today avenue Foch). In c1923 he turned to sculpture and completed commissions for Doucet and others in a Cubist style. He befriended Frangois- Louis Schmied and designed furniture, supplied painted panels and carvings for Jean Dunand and others. He designed stained glass and jewellery; illustrated books; produced decorative sculpture that showed influences of Cubism and West African art. In 1930, became a member of UAM (Unions des Artistes Modernes); in 1940, left Paris and taught in Oyonnax.

Exhibitions

Work shown at sessions of Salon d’Automne:; Salons of Société des Artistes Décorateurs; in 1922, at Léonce Rosenberg’s L’Effort Moderne gallery, Paris; in 1928, at La Renaissance gallery, Paris. From 1930, work shown at UAM exhibitions. Work subject of 1983 exhibition, Centre Culturel Aragon, Oyonnax.

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The Design Encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

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