Eureka Pottery – American Ceramics manufacturer

Vase manufactured by the Eureka Pottery 1883 to 1887
Vase manufactured by the Eureka Pottery 1883 to 1887
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Specialised in Majolica

The Eureka Pottery was an American ceramics manufacturer located in Trenton, New Jersey.

Background

The Eureka Pottery was the last commercial pottery constructed during the historic three decades during which potteries were established in Trenton. The company made the most beautiful majolica in Trenton. It was established in 1883 by Leon Weil, who Noah and Charles Boch succeeded. It was closed in 1887 due to fire, the constant enemy of potteries.

It was influenced by the growing popularity of British brightly coloured majolica shown at the 1876 Philadelphia ‘Centennial Exposition,’ it produced two successful lines called Bird and Fan and Prunus and Fan. Between 1883— 1885, it was located on Mead Avenue, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Their majolica was quality ware fashioned after English patterns. Two marked Eureka patterns were adaptations of Asian designs produced earlier in the century in English majolica. The first was a bird and fan on a pebbly white or blue background. The second was an owl and fan design on a white, brown or pebbly grey background.

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

Karmason, M. G., & Stacke, J. B. (2002). Majolica: A complete history and illustrated survey. Harry N. Abrams.

Snyder, J. B., & Bockol, L. (1994). Majolica: American & European wares. Schiffer Pub. Co.

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