Sculptures by Roy Lichenstein are Simply fun!

Roy Lichtenstein's sculptures Woman: Sunlight, Moonlight 1996
Roy Lichtenstein’s sculptures Woman: Sunlight, Moonlight 1996 (left) and Galatea 1990 (right) during the press preview for Lichtenstein: A Retrospective at Tate Modern, London. (Photo by Anthony Devlin/PA Images via Getty Images)

America dozed off shortly after the end of World War II and slept for a very long period. America had a very nice dream when she slept. It was a vision of an ideal world free from hunger, affliction, peril, and want.

The dream’s surroundings were composed of graphic pictures that had been expertly constructed, including magazine ads, billboard displays, spotless bathrooms and kitchens, house floor plans, glossy trip brochures, television commercials, and comic book panels.

Lets Dream

Jackson Pollack is one example of an Abstract Expressionist who spent years fervently attempting to awaken America from this dream. Other artists, such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, believed that sleep wasn’t necessarily a terrible thing and that the dream that America was having, while it slept, was fascinating and beautiful.

Three Dimensional Sculptures

Roy Lichtenstein actually extracts three-dimensional sculptures from the comic book world, which is his most well-known medium as a painter. 

House I  sculpture by american artist Roy Lichtenstein
Visitors take in the fabricated and painted aluminum, House I sculpture by american artist Roy Lichtenstein at the National Gallery of Art sculpture garden on June 17, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jonathan Newton / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

What appears absurd at first glance? After all, what could be funnier than a painted wood depiction of a stylised explosion like you might see in a comic book? It turns out to be unstoppable entertainment, especially when he applies the idea and its execution to harmless objects found in innocuous magazine and cartoon settings, such as desk lamps and their light cascades, coffee cups and their billows of steam, or other innocuous objects. The sculptures themselves are marvels of balance and design, of proper proportion and deft material handling.

Lichtenstein Mastery

Indeed, Lichtenstein possesses astounding mastery. Coming up with such silly ideas is one thing, but to design, sketch, cast, assemble, deconstruct, paint, and then create a finished object that is just as creative as the original thought is almost astounding.

Each piece seems to have been created, carried out, and completed without a hitch in only five minutes, although many of them took several months. The smeared, dogeared sketches that go with them are miniature works of art in and of themselves, demonstrating the amount of effort and planning that went into each one.

A brushstroke is possibly the last thing anyone would anticipate turning into a sculpture. After all, brush strokes are the two-dimensional building elements of painting, which is the sculpture’s exact opposite.

The truth is that a normal brush stroke is essentially a miniature three-dimensional relief item adhered to a canvas, as anyone who appreciates Van Gogh or Rembrandt will tell you. As a result, Lichtenstein provides a whole series of “Brush Stroke” sculptures, which are essentially primary-coloured daubs that have been multiplied by thousands and given depth and texture by the use of wood, metal, and, yes, paint.

Our reluctance to live in the past or outside of our thoroughly thought-out financial plans for living pleased Lichtenstein, who left all the judgement to us.

A picture was taken on June 30, 2013 shows the artwork “Woman: Sunlight, Moonlight” by late US artist Roy Lichtenstein on display at the Centre Georges Pompidou contemporary art museum in Paris, three days ahead of an exhibition running from July 3 to November 4 2013. (THOMAS SAMSON/AFP via Getty Images)

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

Roy Lichtenstein – Newspapers.com. (1999, June 17). Newspapers.Com; http://www.newspapers.com. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/106628924/roy-lichtenstein/

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