Jasper Morrison (b.1959) British Designer quirky, understated furniture

Jasper Morrison (1959 – ) is a British designer, and he was born and active in London.

Education

Between 1979-82 he studied at the Kingston School of Art and Design. Between 1982-85, Royal College of Art, London. 

Biography

Morrison produced quirky, satiric, understated furniture. His 1986 South Kensington flat was widely published in design magazines. He designed 1988 Door handles I and II, and a 1989 range of aluminium handles produced by FSB in Germany. 

“Design makes things seem special, and who wants normal if they can have special”

Jasper Morrison

He was a founding member of the NATO (Narrative Architecture Today) group of architects in London. Clients included Sheridan Coakley, Vitra, SCP, and Aram Designs. 

Works

Mostly in small-batch production, his design work included;

  • 1981 Handlebar Table
  • 1983 Flower-Pot Table produced by Cappellini
  • 1984 Office System, 
  • 1987 Hat Stand by Aram Designs 
  • 1984 Wingnut Chair, 1982 stools by SCP 
  • 1984 side table by SCP 
  • 1986 console table by SCP 
  • 1985 A Rug of Many Blossoms 
  • 1985 Rise Table, 1986 dining chair 
  • 1986 Thinking Man’s Chair by Cappellini 
  • 1988 Chair 3 by Cappellini 
  • 1984 Ribbed Table by Aram Designs 
  • 1985 Wingnut chair 
  • 1987 One-Legged Table by Cappellini 
  • 1987 chaise longue 
  • 1987 day bed by Cappellini 
  • 1988 sofa by SCP 
  • 1988 plywood desk by Galerie 
  • Neotu benches for the 1989 Frankfurt Art Fair 
  • 1988 3 Green Bottles that Could also Be Clear 
  • 1988-plywood chair by Vitra, three carpets in 1988 
  • 1989 low plywood table 
  • 1989 Panton Project for Vitra
  • 1995 Lima Chair
  • 1993 Bottle Storage Module
  • 2000 Luxmaster F Floorlamp
  • 2006 Super Normal 2006, Super Normal, curated by Jasper Morrison and Naoto Fukasawa at Axis Gallery, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2015, Thingness at Grand-Hornu, Boussu, Belgium

Awards and Recognition

In 1984, he won a Berlin scholarship. His work was included in the;

  • 1986 exhibition at the Shiseido department store in Tokyo 
  • 1986 ‘British Design’. exhibition in Vienna 
  • 1986 ‘English Eccentrics’ exhibition at Galerie Neotu in Paris 
  • 1987 ‘Documenta 8’ (Reuters News-Centre) in Kassel 
  • 1988 ‘Documenta 9’ in Berlin 
  • 1987 exhibition at Parco department store in Tokyo. 

In 1988, one-person exhibitions were mounted at the;

  • Galerie Pentagon in Cologne 
  • Galerie Prodomo 1988 ‘Some new items for the house’ exhibition at the DAAD gallery in Berlin. 
  • His Thinking Man’s Chair was shown at the 1988 Salone del Mobile in Milan. 
  • His 1989 ‘A world slide show’ exhibition was shown at the Leiptien 3 gallery in Frankfurt 
  • 1989 ‘Some new items for the house, Part II’ for Vitra at the Facsimile gallery in Milan 
  • 1989 one-person exhibition at Galerie Neotu in Paris 
  • Work for Sheridan Coakley was shown at the Salone del Mobile in Milan from 1986 and 1989 International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York. 
  • With Matthew Hilton’s work, Morrison’s was included in a 1987 exhibition in Tokyo. 

Interview with Jasper Morrison

Design Shop Chairs

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Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

Wikipedia contributors. (2020, December 12). Jasper Morrison. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:46, January 23, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jasper_Morrison&oldid=993764727

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