What is the difference between a wine decanter and carafe? 🍷

Wine Decanter featured image
Wine Decanter featured image

When you serve wine in a decanter or carafe rather than directly from the bottle, you can completely appreciate its full potential, but why? The wine can oxygenate and aerate, allowing the wine to breathe after being sealed in a bottle for so long. A wine decanter has a reputation for being a formal and refined means of serving wine. However, this isn’t always the case.

Wine decanters and carafes of various forms and sizes are produced by renowned glass manufacturers such as Eisch Glas, Riedel, and Schott Zwiesel. Serving wine from a decanter doesn’t have to be expensive; it’s a technique that anybody can undertake. “What’s the difference between a wine decanter and a carafe?” you might wonder.

What is a Wine Decanter?

A wine decanter’s primary purpose is to preserve and serve wine while also allowing the wine to breathe. The oxygenation process requires a sufficient amount of surface area exposed to the air. Decanters have an essential part in the usage of wine, especially red wine.

In red wines, sediment and shattered cork are frequently seen (typically in older vintages). Pouring into a decanter can help remove any undesirable residue by filtering and eliminating it. It will also get rid of any lingering bitter flavours and aromas that come with aged wines.

Wine decanters traditionally feature a flat base with a broad bowl (up to 30cm). The neck is typically tapered inwards to about 30cm in length. Decanters can come with stoppers to keep the contents sealed until they’re ready to drink. It also slows down the rate at which wines decay when exposed to air.

What is a Wine Carafe?

Traditionally, a carafe was merely a container for water, wine, fruit juice, or alcoholic beverages. Carafes are now more commonly used to serve water and juices. The shape of the container has no bearing on its properties or the flavour of the liquid it holds. These are usually more “showy” and beautiful objects for the table setting to make it look more classy.

Using a carafe is more of an “everyday” occurrence than using a decanter for a more formal occasion. Carafes feature a long body and a narrow base, which allows them to hold vast amounts of liquid. As a result, they take up less space at the dinner table. White or rose wine is most commonly served in a carafe. These wines do not need to be ‘opened up’ as much when opposed to Red Wine.

Decanter Shapes in the Modern Era

PARACITY Wine Decanter Lead-Free Crystal Shaking on the Top 360°Rotating Oxford Engraved Design
PARACITY Wine Decanter Lead-Free Crystal Shaking on the Top 360°Rotating Oxford Engraved Design

In recent years, there have been significant changes in the way decanters are designed and manufactured by various manufacturers. Riedel, a world-renowned Austrian glass company, has designed eye-catching wine decanters. These gorgeous decanters and table centrepieces are functional and put on a show when they are utilised.

To summarise, tradition, shape, and style distinguish these two serving bowls. Wine is served in a Decanter rather than a carafe, which tends to benefit other liquids. In contrast to decanters, which are generally bowl-shaped with a tapered neck, the body of a carafe is long and straight.

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