Bruno Pollack stacking chair

Pollack invented a tubular steel stacking chair, model RP7, which was manufactured from c1932 and revolutionised auditorium seating with its stacking concept. Cox, a British furniture maker, was embroiled in a legal battle with rival Pel in 1934 over the Rp6 stacking chair, which Pel had bought the rights from Pollack.Read More →

Consumerism - Vance Packard

Vance Packard (1914 – 1996) was an American writer who brought many of the less favourable effects of consumerism in the developed world to the public’s attention in a straightforward manner. After graduating from Pennsylvania State University in 1936, he started his career as a journalist writing for several newspapers and the Associated Press before becoming the editor of American magazine from 1942 to 1946.Read More →

Frechet Brothers three chairs

Andre Frechet (1875-1973) and Paul Frechet were French decorators and furniture designers. They were born in Chalons-sur-Mame; and active in Paris.

Working together and individually from 1906, the Frechet brothers’ furniture designs were produced by various firms including Jacquemin freres in Strasbourg, E. Verot, and Charles Jean-selme; 1909-11.Read More →

Charlotte Perriand in the famous “Chaise longue basculante B 306,” from 1929

Charlotte Perriand (1903 – 1999) was a designer and architect from France. Perriand’s designs are most commonly associated with furniture created in the 1920s in collaboration with Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret. Still, her contribution to design was much more critical.Read More →

Charles Plumet furniture

In the year 1861, Charles Plumet was born. As an architect, he built structures in the mediaeval and early French Renaissance styles. He worked on interiors and furniture designs in Art Nouveau styles with Tony Selmersheim (1871–1971). Between 1896 and 1901, Charles Plumet joined l’Art dans Tout (Art in Everything), an association of architects, painters, and sculptors who consciously attempted to renew decorative art, adopting styles ranging from adapted mediaeval to Art Nouveau. Read More →

One of the foremost universities in Vienna, Austria, is TU Wien (TUW; German: Technische Universität Wien; also known in English as the Vienna University of Technology from 1975–2014). The University has gained comprehensive international and domestic recognition in both teaching and science and is a highly respected partner of innovation-oriented enterprises.Read More →

Armand Point featured image

Armand Point (1861-1932) was a Symbolist painter, engraver, and designer from France, one of the Salon de la Rose + Croix founding members.

Point’s first paintings were orientalist scenes of markets and musicians and scenes from his childhood in Algeria’s streets. In 1888, he moved to Paris to study under Auguste Herst and Fernand Cormon at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Read More →

Hans Poelzig was a German architect and designer, he was born in Berlin. Between 1888-95, studied Technische Hochschule, Berlin Charlottenburg and Technische Hocschule, Berlin, under Karl Schäffer.

Between 1899-1916, he worked in his own office in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland) and, 1900-16, taught at the Kunst- und Kunstgewerbeschule (after 1911, called the Akademe für Kunst und Kunstgewerbe) in Breslau, where he was director from 1903Read More →

The Universal Typeface Experiment is a promotional website sponsored by Société Bic, the Bic pen’s manufacturer. The website crowdsources a typeface from smartphone users who use a touchpad and a newly modified BIC pen named the Crystal Stylus, a touchpad-friendly rubber tip, to enter their handwriting on the website.Read More →