Simon (Page 2)

I am the editor of Encyclopedia.Design. Encyclopedia.Design is website intended to provide accurate and detailed information directly relevant to the development of decorative and applied arts over the past 125 years regarding individuals, businesses, and materials.

Universal Typeface - Herbert Bayer

The universal typeface, 1925, was a geometric alphabet based on bar and circle and was designed by Herbert Bayer (1900) to function efficiently in a technological society. Bayer rejected the “archaic and complicated gothic alphabet” which lingered in the most scientifically advanced society of its time, Germany of the first world war period and the postwar era. Read More →

Zandra Rhodes featured image

Zandra Rhodes studied lithography and printing at Medway College before going on to the Royal College of Art to study textiles, graduating in 1964 during the height of the pop movement. She made a paper wedding dress that cost less than two shillings, motivated by this trend and the work of painter Roy Lichtenstein in particular (about 7 new pence). In 1967, paper clothing was all the rage: it was the ultimate representation of disposable apparel.Read More →

Luce Rie Ceramics

Lucie Rie (1902 – 1995) was an Austrian-born British ceramicist. Between 1922-26, she studied fine art, at Kunstgewerbeschule, Vienna, under Michael Powolny. Her most famous works are vases, bottles, and bowls inspired by Japan. Lucie Rie Footed Bowl c. 1951, owned by publisher Susan Shaw. Gold medal for work in the Austrian pavilion at the 1937 Paris ‘Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques clans la Vie Moderne’ Exhibition of her work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.Read More →

Wine Decanter featured image

When you serve wine in a decanter or carafe rather than directly from the bottle, you can completely appreciate its full potential, but why? The wine can oxygenate and aerate, allowing the wine to breathe after being sealed in a bottle for so long. A wine decanter has a reputation for being a formal and refined means of serving wine. However, this isn’t always the case.Read More →

Penguin Book Covers

Tschichold created new standards of text arrangement and style that inspired all of the British postwar graphic design, although only working for the publication for three years. Then, with the formulation of the “Penguin Composition Rules,” he was able to apply Modernist theory to the requirements of book manufacturing.Read More →

Clément Mére furniture

Clément Mère was born in Bayonne and active in Paris. He was a French painter, table-builder, artist and furniture builder.

He studied painting with Jean-Léon Gérôme at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris.Read More →

Dan Svarth featured image

Dan Svarth is a Danish designer. He studied at the Kunsthåndvrærkerskolen, Copenhagen, to 1967, furniture design, Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, to 1969. Read More →

Quinta Armchair by Mario Botta

Mario Botta’s chair Quinta (Fifth) shares the same obvious structural rigour and continuous frame as tubular-steel chairs designed in the 1920s. Read More →

Vendo 44 - Vending Machine

The Vendo 44 Coca-Cola bottle vending machine was produced between 1956 and 1959. Despite being only 16 wide, 15.5 deep, and 58 high, it could fit 44 bottles of coke. It has a white top and a heavy gauge steel case with bright red enamel.Read More →

La Danese domestic goods manufacturer

La Danese was founded in Milan by Bruno Danese and Jacqueline Vodoz. The company specialised in editing, designing, and marketing well‐designed everyday products with a modern aesthetic. There were three significant focus areas: domestic and office products, artistic editions, and children’s games and creative play stimuli. Read More →

Susie Cooper ceramics featured image

Breakfast in an American middle-class home in the 1940s was often served on dishes designed by English designer Susie Cooper (1902-1995).Read More →

Adelaide Robineau Ceramicist

Adelaide Romineau was an American ceramicist she was born in Middletown, Connecticut. At the time, few women were involved in the technical aspects of ceramic production. It was considered appropriate for women to be decorators only, rather than to be part of more technical pursuits.Read More →

Typography featured image

It helps to have an appropriate language to talk about typography.  The following is a glossary of some of the words and their definitions that are used to described typography.Read More →

Shagreen Glass Case

Shagreen is fish skin used as a veneer to cover furniture and accessories. Also knownRead More →

Wrought iron an example - featured image

The term “wrought iron” refers to the material rather than the products made of iron. Modern mild steel has supplanted wrought iron, a forgeable ferrous material used up until about the middle of the twentieth century. Because of the extensive forming required during its production—under power hammers and through rollers—it was originally referred to as “wrought” (or “worked”). Read More →

SS Normandie Art Deco Palace

The ship, its decor, and furniture reflected everything stylish, sophisticated, forward-thinking, and French when it was launched in the age of grand style, a decade after the successful exposition of modern design at the 1925 Paris exhibition.Read More →

Raymond Subes Console with Marble Top

Raymond Subes (1893–1970) was a French metalsmith. He made ironwork for the oceanliners 1931 Atlantique, 1926 Ile-de-France, Pasteur, and 1935 Normandie. After World War II, he worked as a metalworker and became the head of Borderel et Robert.Read More →

Guilloche design term

The guilloche is a decorative element that encircles a line of bosses with two bands or ribbons intertwined. In the British Regency style, it was particularly well-liked and adopted by furniture designers from Renaissance to the Twenties and Fifties.Read More →

Léon Jallot featured image

Léon Jallot (1874­-1967), a scion of the French Art Nouveau, stood out within the movement as an ébéniste, or cabinet maker.Read More →

World Atlas of Coffee Book Cover

World Atlas of Coffee. Coffee has never been better or more interesting than it is today. Where coffee comes from, how it was harvested and the roasting process are just a few factors that influence the taste of what we drink. Champion barista and coffee expert James Hoffmann examines these key factors.Read More →