Gustav Klutsis Book Cover

Gustav Klutsis was a Latvian artist and graphic, poster and applied arts designer. Born in 1895 Klutsis was a devoted supporter of the Boshevik regime and he was a member of the communist party. He was considered the pioneer of photomontage in the Soviet Union and an acclaimed graphic designer and painter. Klutsis was one of the earliest artists to use the photomontage technique for visual propaganda.  He subsequently emerged as a brilliant creator of Stalinist political art.Read More →

Artifort design manufacturer

Artifort used freelance designers, including Kho Liang Le and Pierre Paulin. It produced chairs, settees, and tables. It first used plastics in Paulin’s 1965 Chair 582 in tensioned rubber and latex foam and his 1965-66 Armchair 303 in polyester fibreglass. It produced Paulin’s 1953 Chair 157 in polyester, ABS, and elastomers and 1967 F577 chair. Read More →

Ida Ekblad Norwegian artist

Ida Ekblad’s practise incorporates painting and sculpture but also poetry, filmmaking and performance. The Norwegian artist has collaborated with multiple artists and musicians. Her sources of inspiration include artist figures such as Odilon Redon, Joy Orbison, Lina Bo Bardi, the acting of Gena Rowlands and the writing of Haldis MorenRead More →

International Harvesters Truck

He arrived in the United States in 1929, just in time for the great depression. As it happened the beginning of the depression was a fortuitous time for a talented designer with new ideas to arrive in the United States. The old design aesthetic was disappearing with the collapsing economy. Manufacturers wanted to stimulate demand for their products by offering customers new designs, and Loewy had an abundance of them with the ego to match. His mother had always told him, “It is better to be envied than pitied.”Read More →

Vivian Maier street photographer

Found after her death, Vivian Maier’s photographs capture New York City in motion.

Two years before Vivian Maier died in 2009 at age 83, 30,000 of her negatives were bought at a Chicago thrift auction by former estate agent John Maloof.Read More →

The poster has established itself as an integral part of modern marketing and has acquired the status of a typical Swiss quality product just like the one it was intended to sell. A good example is the poster designed in 1952 by Herbert Leupin (1916–1999) for the Pelikan fountain pen company. Showing an eponymous bird with a pen in its beak and a wing ink, it’s done with very little text. The message is simple: the bird is a brand name. Anyone looking to buy a fountain pen.Read More →

Universal Typeface - Herbert Bayer

The universal typeface, 1925, was a geometric alphabet based on bar and circle and was designed by Herbert Bayer (1900) to function efficiently in a technological society. Bayer rejected the “archaic and complicated gothic alphabet” which lingered in the most scientifically advanced society of its time, Germany of the first world war period and the postwar era. Read More →

Börje Rajalin, a bracelet

Borje Rajalin is a Finnish Jewellery Designer.

Rajalin worked at Bertel Gardberg’s silversmith from 1952 – 1956.  His design work included technical equipment, plastic fittings, cutlery, stainless steel table and cookware and with Anti Nurmesniemi in 1972 a train for the Helsinki Railway.  They collaborated with station designers to make the metro stations modern and chic.  Rajalin produced silver designs for Bertel Gardberg and jewellery for Kalevala Koru.  He taught at Taideeteollinen Oppilaitos and was the director of Taidetelinen Ammattikoulu in Helsinki.Read More →

Movable type - Gutenberg

Sourced from Daily Press – Newport News Virginia 17 April 1939 The invention of movable types in Europe, as we all know, has been generally attributed to Gutenberg —  just as the steam engine has popularly been considered that of Watt.  However Watt did not invent the steam engine; heRead More →

The way Dieter Rams tell it good design boils down to something as simple durability.

Okay, not durability alone. A Well-designed piece is so self-explanatory that figuring out how to use it as simple as looking at it. And a design develops from the inside out because it involves not only aesthetics but also function.Read More →

Royal Academy of Art

They are an Academy They have a lot in common with museums and other galleries, but as an academy they have a wider position to play – to encourage not just the appreciation and understanding of art, but also its practise. Led by artists Like the founders of the Academy,Read More →

RIBA winner example

The RIBA has been awarding the President’s Medals annually since 1836, making them the Institute’s oldest prizes and probably the oldest awards worldwide in the field of architecture. The Institute runs several other awards, including the Stirling Prize for the best new building of the year; the Royal Gold Medal (first awarded in 1848), which honours a distinguished body of work; the Stephen Lawrence Prize, funded by the Marco Goldschmied Foundation, for projects with a construction budget of less than £1,000,000, and the President’s Awards for Science.Read More →

Østerild Visitors and Operation Center / Cubo Arkitekter In 2016, Cubo won the architectural competition for a new Visitors and National Test Center for the world’s largest wind turbines placed on land. A Center that communicates the research and technology of the windmills to the public, while the wind turbineRead More →