Dictionary

George III partridge-wood tea-caddy

Brazilian partridge wood is said to have dark streaks that resemble partridge plumage. This timber has a distinctive figure, occasionally with lighter stripes that resemble the markings on a partridge’s wing. It has a trunk diameter of at least 30 inches and grows to a height of 90 to 100 feet.Read More →

Example of a London Moquette seat on the London Underground

Moquette is a tough woollen fabric used for upholstery on public transportation all over the world. The fabric is typically composed of 85% wool and 15% nylon and is created using the weaving method known as jacquard. It has excellent thermal characteristics, keeping you warm in the winter and cool in the summer.Read More →

Typography featured image with the word 'Art' hidden in middle of image

It helps to have an appropriate language to talk about typography.ย  The following is a glossary of some of the words and their definitions that are used to described typography.Read More →

Shagreen Glass Case

Shagreen is fish skin used as a veneer to cover furniture and accessories. Also knownRead More →

Wrought iron an example - featured image

The term “wrought iron” refers to the material rather than the products made of iron. Modern mild steel has supplanted wrought iron, a forgeable ferrous material used up until about the middle of the twentieth century. Because of the extensive forming required during its productionโ€”under power hammers and through rollersโ€”it was originally referred to as “wrought” (or “worked”). Read More →

Guilloche design term

The guilloche is a decorative element that encircles a line of bosses with two bands or ribbons intertwined. In the British Regency style, it was particularly well-liked and adopted by furniture designers from Renaissance to the Twenties and Fifties.Read More →

beige and black chair in front of white desk

Minimalism is an art historical and critical term. The purest forms of minimalism include cubes and spheres, plain, unadorned surfaces, and solid colours. Adolf Loos’ famous quote, “Ornament is a Crime,” has become catchphrases for the minimalist design movement.Read More →

A silver-gilt convex shield with a sizable central medallion depicting the shield of encrusted iron made by the god Hephaestus for Achilles at Troy, as it is described by Homer in Book 18 of the Iliad. The medallion, which depicts in high relief a figure of the Sun (Apollo) standing in a quadriga (a chariot drawn by four horses), is within a broad border decorated with a continuous frieze.Read More →

Regarding silverware, the design can be found on several hollow pieces that are repeatedly employed to create a band around the calyx of the piece. It was a well-known aspect of the RENAISSANCE STYLE, and later of the neo-classical style, the Adam style, and once more the regency style. The leaf, whose form changes over time, can be found as either applied or embossed decoration.Read More →

Silverware - Academic Style

A style of decoration, developed in the United States, based on the copying of earlier English and French styles. The style was in the tradition of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, the designs being precise and academic. It was introduced to flatware in the 1880s, initiated at the Gorham Company and occurs in hollow ware from the late 1880s, its use continued into the 1920s.Read More →

Ablution Basin - Oxford

Ablution basin. A type of basin for holding water intended: (1) in ecclesiastical usage, for rinsing the hands or some object of church plate, such as a chalice; or (2) in secular usage, for rinsing the fingers at the dinner table (sometimes called a rose-water basin). Its founder donated two ecclesiastical ablution basins in 1515-16 to Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Bishop Richard Fox. See alms dish.Read More →