• Pâte de Verre – art and design term
    Pâte de Verre (French, “glass paste”) is a material produced by grinding glass into a fine powder, adding a binder to create a paste, and adding a fluxing medium to facilitate melting. The paste is brushed or tamped into a mould, dried, and fused by firing. After annealing, the object is removed from the mould and finished.Read More →
  • Emily LaBarge on Erin O’Keefe
    The wrongness of images, or our apperceptions of them: What appears to be a painting is actually a photograph. What appear to be two-dimensional painted lines, curves, rectangles, arabesques, planes of color, or abstract geometries with trompe l’oeil shadows are in fact three-dimensional objects carefully arranged, brightly illuminated, and flattened into a beguiling single plane by the lens of a camera.Read More →
  • Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel unveils a new social housing complex for Milan
    a social housing project that fosters a sense of community and offers a wealth of facilities outside the city center. that’s what antonio citterio patricia viel (ACPV) achieves with ‘cascina merlata lot R7/2’ in milan, italy. located in the cascina merlata district of northwestern milan, this latest development forms part of a greater masterplan conceived by ACPV in 2011.Read More →
  • Naoto Fukasawa’s Latest Chair Dials Into Our Unconscious Behavior
    It’s no coincidence that modern design history is told by chairs rather than cars, typefaces, or home appliances. So many extraordinary chairs were borne from innovative use of materials, a microcosm of objets d’art that take us through a series of key technological episodes in the evolution of design.Read More →
  • Tissot Heritage Memphis Limited Edition Watches
    For 2021, Swiss Tissot is re-releasing an interesting neo-Bauhaus watch it originally debuted in the late 1980s as conceived by the creator of one of the most interesting design schools of modern times: Ettore Sottsass.Read More →
  • 5 Designing Women: Meet the First Ladies Of Malaysian Design
    Since Breakfast Thieves, Liang has been busy with a wide variety of projects including more cafes and retail spaces, all showcasing her clean aesthetic and meticulously detailed hand. She’s also started her own range of stackable wooden furniture and home accessories.Read More →
  • Royal treatment: Consider renting these luxurious European castles
    There was a time when backpacking through Europe was on every twenty-something’s summer ‘rite of passage’ bucket list. Fast forward to 2021, and we’ve moved on to a more luxurious version of this notion – renting castles for a spectacular first-class vacation experience.Read More →
  • The joy of geraniums
    Is there anything more joyous than geraniums? Bright, resilient and utterly undemanding, these pleasers of the botanical world are surely the flora for our times. “Geraniums are the no-brainer gift that keeps on giving,” says the florist Kitten Grayson. “As long as you deadhead them, they’ll flower continuously and last for years.Read More →
  • Casa Mutina Modena is an immersive showcase of minimalist interiors
    Casa Mutina Modena is an immersive showcase of minimalist interiors Designed by OEO Studio, Casa Mutina Modena comprises four apartments showcasing Italian tile brand Mutina’s entire range. The immersive setting merges iconic design with a calming interior scheme Italian tile company Mutina launches a new interiors service, previewed with a new space in the heart of Modena.Read More →
  • Louis Midavaine (1888 – 1978) French accessories and furniture designer
    Louis Midavaine (1888 – 1978) was a French accessories and furniture designer. He was born in Roubaix. He studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Roubaix.Read More →
  • Marcel Gascoin (1907 – 1986) French furniture designer and decorator
    Marcel Gascoin (1907 – 1986) was a French furniture designer and decorator. He studied architecture, at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, under Henri Sauvage. Read More →
  • Cheney Brothers (1838 – 1955) textile and silk manufactures
    The Cheney Brothers were American textile manufacturers. They were located in Manchester and Hartford, Connecticut. Cheney Brothers’ achievement in becoming one of the leading silk manufacturers in the USA was based on the family’s business expertise and broad knowledge of technical processes.Read More →
  • Henri Navarre (1885 – 1970) French sculptor architect and silversmith
    Henri Navarre (1885 – 1970) was a French sculptor, architect, silversmith, and glassmaker. He was born in Paris. He served apprenticeships in architecture, goldsmithing, and silver-smithing. He studied wood carving at the École Bernard Palissy and stained glass and mosaics, Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers, both in Paris.Read More →
  • Aune Siimes (1909 – 1964) Finnish ceramicist
    Aune Siimes (1909 – 1964) was a Finnish ceramicist. She attended Taideteollinen Korkeakoulu in Helsinki from 1932 to 1933.Read More →
  • Alfredo Simonit Italian furniture designer
    Alfredo Simonit is an Italian designer. He was born in Romans d ‘Isonzo. Professionally active S. Giovanni al Natisone. Read More →
  • Silver and twentieth-century design
    The impact of silver metal technology has driven the development of modern furnishings throughout the 20th century. The transformation of a chair into a sculptural statement, for example. Within a multi-function, interior metal objects have not always been at the forefront of modern design. With the emphasis on warmth andRead More →
  • The beauty of symmetry
    Design, fashion art, architecture all make use of symmetry. If a design or a structure is symmetrical, then it has balance and harmony, which people say makes it pleasant to look at. Symmetry speaks of deep connections that lie underneath superficial differences. When symmetry appears even subtly, it causes an intuitiveRead More →
  • Monkey man – black and white stencil – Newtown
    Monkey man playing tennis wearing a white tee-shirt and a determined look black and white stencil – Newtown.Read More →
  • Toby my much-beloved studio dog
    Toby is my much-beloved studio dog. He offers an almost human level of companionship, for all of the animals dogs mostly resemble people in virtue of understanding, affection, and co-operation.Read More →
  • La La Land a must see for designers – reblog
    I saw La La Land this weekend and Damien Chazelle musical is brilliant and emotional tribute to the 1950’s musical. Visually stunning eye candy for my inner graphic designer. Not so much a visual re-imaging of Los Angeles as a opportunity to see it through an artists eye. Chazelles last film, “Whiplash”used Jazz as a tool to explore ambition, the price of achieving excellence. Read More →
  • Marc Newson industrial designer from Sydney, Australia.
    Mark Newson is an industrial designer from Sydney, Australia. He earned his education at Sydney’s College of Art, where he majored in jewellery design.Read More →
  • National School of Fine Arts, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    The Escola de Belas Artes (School of Fine Arts) is a former colonial school that is now part of the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.Read More →
  • Oscar Niemeyer (1907 – 1912) Brazilian architect and designer
    Oscar Niemeyer (1907 – 1912) was a Brazilian architect and designer. He was born in Rio de Janeiro. He studied architecture at the National School of Fine Arts, Rio de Janeiro.Read More →
  • How the Barbizon Hotel Defined Women’s Ambition | The New Republic
    On May 31, 1953, 20-year-old Sylvia Plath arrived in New York City. She was a rising senior at Smith College and already a published author, with three poems sold to Harper’s; she was also just a few months away from her first suicide attempt.Read More →
  • Lithography (Design Term)
    A method of printing from a design drawn directly on a slab of stone or other suitable material. The design is not raised in relief as in woodcut or incised as in line engraving, but drawn on a smooth printing surface. Initially, this surface was provided with a slab ofRead More →
  • Gerrit Thomas Rietveld – Dutch architect and furniture designer
    Gerrit Thomas Rietveld was a Dutch architect and furniture maker, and designer. He was born in Utrecht.  Probably the most innovative and avant-garde designer of his time, Rietveld’s furniture designs were ground-breaking both visually and from a production stand-point. Even 90 years later, his chairs look as fascinating as theyRead More →
  • Ernest Race (1913 – 1964) British furniture and industrial designer
    Ernest Race (1913 – 1964) was a British furniture and industrial designer. He was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Between 1932-35, he studied interior design at the Bartlett School of Architecture of London University and 1937-39, weaving in India. Read More →
  • Primerose Bordier (1929 – 1995) French textile designer
    Primrose Bordier (1929 – 1995) was a French designer known for her colourful and innovative home textiles. She studied at the Atelier Charpentier in Paris.Read More →
  • Osvaldo Borsani (1911 – 1985) Italian furniture designer and architect
    Osvaldo Borsani was born in Varedo Switzerland at the crossroads of craft and modern manufacturing. The son of a cabinetmaker, he trained as an architect in Milan in the 1930s, when the city was a centre of technological advancement and flourishing artistry, with the economic momentum to push both at speed.Read More →
  • Tecno Italian Furniture manufacturer
    Tecno an innovative Italian furniture manufacturer was founded By Osvaldo Borsani and Fulgenzio Borsani. The operation had evolved from Atelier Varedo, the workshop of the father in Varedo, and the subsequent small firm Arredamento Borsani. Among other models, it produced Osvaldo Borsani. Among other models, it produced Osvaldo’ Borsani’s successful 1953 p40 chair and 1953 D70.Read More →
  • The P40 articulated lounge chair
    Osvaldo Borsani Armchair (P40) 1955, articulated chaise longue. The rubber-armed chair was a sophisticated ‘machine for sitting’ that could it was claimed, assume 486 positions.Read More →
  • Chair No.14, 1855 by Michael Thonet
    Bentwood furniture was not invented by Michael Thonet (1798-1871), but he perfected a method for mass production. In 1819, in Boppard, Germany, he opened his cabinetmaking business, and by 1840 he had invented the steam-softening technique for bending rods of hardwood into flowing yet structurally solid shapes. There are just six sections and screws in his all-time classic, Model No.14. Read More →
  • More Inside an Eclectic Los Angeles Wonderland Home designed by AD100 Firm Charlap Hyman & Herrero | Architectural Digest
    “When people get older, they often lose their playful spirit. I want to hold on to the fun,” said the owner Yoram Heller when it came to the design of the home. Source: More Inside an Eclectic Los Angeles Wonderland Home designed by AD100 Firm Charlap Hyman & Herrero |Read More →
  • The Women of the Bauhaus School – Artsy
    The male icons of the Bauhaus—like Klee and Albers—are world-renowned. But the women artists who taught, studied, and made groundbreaking work with them are often remembered in history books as wives of their male counterparts or, worse, not at all.Read More →
  • Fashion Photos to Get Spotlight at Les Arts Décoratifs Exhibition
    Some of the most iconic fashion photographs of all time, including Horst P. Horst’s 1991 image of a model in a Mainbocher corset, are to go on display at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris as part of a major “Photographic Tales” exhibition slated to open April 1. Source:Read More →
  • Lust, heartbreak and suggestive sculpture: was this art’s greatest love triangle?
    The sensual American graffitist Cy Twombly, who lived in Italy from the late 1950s until his death in 2011, lushly inscribed his epic canvases with love poetry – Shelley and Keats, Cavafy and Catullus. The work was like an abstract expressionist Valentine’s card.Read More →
  • Black Mountain College art exhibit
    Connecting Legacies: A First Look at the Dreier Black Mountain College Archive” features archival objects from the Theodore Dreier Sr. Document Collection presented alongside artworks from the Asheville Art Museum’s Black Mountain College Collection to explore the connections between artworks and ephemera. Read More →
  • Painting by Other Means
    Painter James Bishop has died at age 93. His lyrical abstractions juxtapose fields of colour or expanses of primed and painted canvas. He often worked on found materials, displaying careful attention to his substrate’s surface. In an essay for our October 2008 issue, artist and critic Joe Fyfe responded to a retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago that centred Bishop’s work on paper. “Bishop’s paintings on paper arise from a carefully determined process and an openness to accident,” Fyfe writes. “Working on a small scale, often in series, he achieves a gentle grandeur.”Read More →
  • Florence Koehler American artist, craftsperson and designer
    Florence Koehler was an American artist, craftsperson, designer, and jeweller, professionally active in Chicago, London and Rome. She was one of the best-known jewellers of the Arts and Crafts movement that flourished in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In Chicago, Koehler’s jewellery in a crafts style was fashionable in artistic circles. Koehler became one of the American crafts-revival leaders in jewellery, related more to French than English styles.Read More →
  • Kaare Klint – Danish furniture designer
    Kaare Klint – Danish furniture designer. The Danes were greatly influenced by Germany’s Bauhaus movement in the early part of the twentieth century. Read More →
  • Børge Mogensen (1914 – 1972) Danish furniture designer
    Børge Mogensen (1914 – 1972) was a Danish furniture designer. 1936-38, studied Kunsthåndværkerskolen, Copenhagen, and 1938-42, furniture, Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, Copenhagen, under Kaare Klint. Read More →
  • J39 Chair by Børge Morgensen
    The J39 Chair was designed in 1947 by Børge Mogensen. J39 is a flexible solid wood masterpiece featuring a hand-woven seat with a natural paper cord. In 1939, just beginning his design career, when Mogensen was a 28-year-old architect, he followed his vision of producing high-quality, practical furniture that could popularise modernist design for the general public.Read More →
  • Finn Juhl (1912 – 1989) influential Danish Designer
    Finn Juhl was one of the most influential Danish designers of the 20th century and closely associated with the Danish Modern concept. Juhl was widely known for his furniture design and product design, with a lesser but excellent reputation for architecture and interior design.Read More →
  • Artemide Italian Lighting Company
    Artemide Italian Lighting Company – Artemide is an Italian lighting and furniture manufacturer it is in located Pregnana Milanese. Read More →
  • Artifort Dutch furniture manufacturer
    Artifort used freelance designers, including Kho Liang Le and Pierre Paulin. It produced chairs, settees, and tables. It first used plastics in Paulin’s 1965 Chair 582 in tensioned rubber and latex foam and his 1965-66 Armchair 303 in polyester fibreglass. It produced Paulin’s 1953 Chair 157 in polyester, ABS, and elastomers and 1967 F577 chair. Read More →
  • AIGA – American Institute of Graphic Arts – What is it?
    The American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) is a professional design organisation. Members practice all forms of communication design, including graphic design, typography, interaction design, user experience, branding and identity. The objective of the organisation is to be the standard bearer of professional ethics and practice in the design profession. TRead More →
  • What is mid-century modern? The popular design style, explained
    Mid-century modern-inspired style can be found everywhere, whether it’s the full-blown theme of a room or a space that simply has hints of it. Though the period itself emerged in the 1940s (and technically ended in the late ’60s and early ’70s), people are still adorning their homes in furniture, colours, and materials that look like they could be plucked from home in 1955. Read more >Read More →
  • Ida Ekblad Norwegian genre crossing artist
    Ida Ekblad’s practise incorporates painting and sculpture but also poetry, filmmaking and performance. The Norwegian artist has collaborated with multiple artists and musicians. Her sources of inspiration include artist figures such as Odilon Redon, Joy Orbison, Lina Bo Bardi, the acting of Gena Rowlands and the writing of Haldis MorenRead More →
  • Street Art Medley Newtown – 2018
    I took a couple of photos of Newtown local street art back in 2018.   These three pieces are located in the little laneway behind the Buzz Bar in Newtown. You may also be interested in Mural – Goddard Street, Newtown – Encyclopedia of Design A ocean themed mural has poppedRead More →
  • Josef Pohl (1894 – 1975) Czech lighting designer
    Josef Pohl (1894 – 1975) was a Czech lighting designer. He designed the 1929 precursor of the adjustable lamp. Gerd Balzer produced his model. As part of its Kamden collection, Korting und Mathieson created a similar lamp. Pohl and others at the Bauhaus also executed the prototype adjustable wall lamp illustrated in Staaliches Bauhaus, Weimar and produced by Jucker. In 1932, Balzer and Pohl were given the task of coordinating Bauhaus students’ work, which culminated in a competition for conference and furniture design.Read More →