American designer ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ

Alexey Brodovitch

Alexey Brodovitch (1898 – 1971) was an American/Russian graphic designer and magazine art director. Alexey Brodovitch was born in Russia and worked in Paris in the 1920s, creating books, posters, furniture, and advertising. He moved to America in 1930 and worked as the art director of Harper’s Bazaar magazine in New York after a brief stint of teaching and advertising.Read More →

Harvey Littleton Glassware

Between 1939-42 and 1946-47, he studied at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, receiving a bachelor’s degree in design. In 1941 and 1949-51, he studied Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, receiving a master’s degree in ceramics. In 1945, he was a student at the Brighton School of Art, Brighton, under Nora Braden’s tutelage.Read More →

Ray and Charles Eames

They were full collaborators as husband and wife. Design is infrequently a solitary endeavour, and husband-and-wife teams are not uncommon. The collaborative nature of the Eames work, on the other hand, was easily obscured by Charles’s widespread public recognition as an individual designer and thinker.Read More →

Plymouth ENR designed by Virgil Exner

He was hired to work in the Pontiac design lab after coming to the attention of Harley Earl at General Motors. Later, in 1938, he worked for Raymond Loewy’s design consultant on Studebaker cars, particularly the 1947 Starlight coupรฉ. Loewy received the majority of the critical accolades.ย Read More →

LaGardo Tackett featured image

He ran a pottery studio from 1946 to 1954. He taught at Los Angeles’s California School of Design, where he and his students developed outdoor pottery planters, which resulted in establishing the Architectural Pottery in 1950.Read More →

Alexander Calder

He worked as an engineer in Rutherford, New Jersey, in 1919, and as a draftsperson and engineer in West Coast logging camps from 1919 to 23; from 1923 to 1930, he was active in New York, sketching for the National Police Gazette 1925โ€”26; in 1926, he travelled to England and Paris, where he produced his 1927โ€”28 miniature circus and worked on wood sculpture; was best known for his mobiles,’ hanging sculptures whose amorphic and bio His linear, wiry images were most likely influenced by Joan Miro and Paul Klee. Read More →

Albert Free House in Palm Springs

Frey was born in Zurich, Switzerland, and obtained his architecture diploma from the Winterthur Institute of Technology in 1924. Frey got technical training in traditional building construction rather than design education in the then-popular Beaux-Arts style. Frey worked in construction during his school vacations and apprenticed with architect A. J. Arter in Zurich before getting his diploma.Read More →

William Dwiggins featured image

Dwiggins was born in Martinsville, Ohio in 1880, he had studied East in Chicago, and then he moved to Boston. ย Between the years 1917-1918, he became the acting director of the Harvard University Press. ย He also worked for the Yale Universty Press, designing jackets, endpapers, bindings and posters.Read More →

Oscar Mayer Wienermobile

Brooks Stevens was an American industrial designer. He was born in Wisconsin and was active in Milwaukee. He studied at Cornell University in Utica, New York.Read More →

Kitchen Tools with Lamb Wedge-Lock Handles by Thomas Lamb

Thomas Lamb founded his textile design studio at seventeen, specialising in advertising, fashion, and magazine illustration. In the 1920s, his bedspreads, napkins, and draperies were immensely popular. Many New York department stores carried them, including Lord & Taylor, Macy’s, and Saks Fifth Avenue.Read More →

Little Caesar Art Direction Anton Grot

Antoni Franciszek Groszewski was born in Kiebasin, Poland, and passed away in Stanton, California. He majored in interior decoration, illustration, and design at the Krakow art academy and a technical school in Kรถnigsberg, Germany. In 1909, he changed his name and moved to the United States.Read More →

Gere Kavanaugh Textile

Kavanaugh worked for General Motors as a stylist, primarily designing exhibitions to demonstrate autos and creating displays, model kitchens, and interiors. She was one of the company’s first female designers, called the “Damsels of Design” by design director Harley Earl. Read More →

Keith Haring Mural โ€“ Collingwood, Australia

Those who have an interest in the art world will instantly recognize this Melbourne wall mural as the work of Keith Haring. Haring was born in 1958 and was known for being one of the main figures who brought street art into the mainstream sphere. His social activism and philanthropic values made Haring an iconic character and his murals are just one legacy he left behind. Read More →

The Eames office

The event will follow in fashion with the first initial debut of the concept where one could find vintage products, reprints of Mr. and Mrs. Eames, special projects and collaborations. There will be four sections namely the โ€œEames Houseโ€ which looks into the coupleโ€™s own residence, โ€œArchitecture & Interiors,โ€ โ€œArt & Technologyโ€ which introduces their sculptures and furniture works and โ€œPlay & Learnโ€ for products that give a sense of playfulness and curiosity. Read More →

Standing over four feet tall, this towering console of satin chrome and mirrored cobalt glass is a commanding example of the styling of items to meet the Machine Age ideal of the 1930s. The Nocturne radio, built by Walter Dorwin Teague, one of the premier industrial designers of the 1930s, is one of the most striking manifestations of the merger of art and technology. Read More →