artist

Hannah Hoch's 1925 "Equillibre," or Balance," was originally titled "America Balancing Europe."

As a designer, I am passionate about the history of art and their influence on ‘visual design.’  In art history, Dada is the artistic movement that preceded Surrealism, it began in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1916 by a group of mostly painters and painters.  Dada artworks challenged the preconceived notions of what art meant.  Many Dadaists felt that the way to salvation was through political anarchy, the natural emotions, the intuitive and the irrational.Read More →

two fridas

Frida Kahlo was a Mexican artist that lived most of her life and physical pain, yet she continued to paint until her death, her artwork records her suffering and experiences as a woman. She was born to a Mexican mother and a German father.Read More →

Roger Fry Garment featured image

Roger Fry was a British painter, writer, art critic, designer, and lecturer. He was born in London. Between 1885 – 1890, he studied natural sciences, Cambridge University, and Académie Julian, Paris, 1892. Read More →

Yoshitomo Nara featured image

Nara grew up in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, about 300 miles north of the Tochigi Prefecture. His exposure to Western music on the American military radio station Far East Network in Honshu influenced his artistic imagination early. Later, he would provide cover art for bands including Shonen Knife, R.E.M., and Bloodthirsty Butchers.Read More →

The Innocent Eye Test by Mark Tansy

“The Innocent Eye Test” (1981) is perhaps the best-known work of Mark Tansey and oneRead More →

William Merritt Chase featured image

He settled in New York in 1878; subsequently, he taught at Art Students’ League, New York, in 1896. He established the New York School of Fine and Applied Art (sometimes referred to as Chase School of Art). Read More →

Charles Burchfield Featured Image

Burchfield was pegged, to some degree, as a regionalist; however, he was working with his personal form of realism.  He rejected the regionalist moniker; instead, he viewed himself as an American artist.Read More →

Javier Mariscal Designer featured image

Javier Mariscal is a Spanish designer. He was born in Valencia. He is professionally active in Barcelona. He studied at the Escuela de Grafismo Elisava, Barcelona, to 1971.Read More →

Winold Reiss Interior

Influenced by the international modern art movements that had recently swept across Europe, he blended cubism, which used geometric shapes to create abstract images, and fauvism, which favoured the use of bold colours to suggest shapes, with interest in ethnography to create a unique style of portraiture that sought to reveal the subject more thoroughly than the simple rendering of physical features.Read More →

Nikolai Mikhailovich Suetin (1897-1954) was a Russian artist, ceramicist, and designer. He was born in Metlevsk Station Kaluga. He was the husband of Anna Leporskaia. Between 1918-22, he studied Vitebsk Art School. He became a member of Kazimir Malevich’s Posnovis/Unovis group in 1919, and, with Il’ia Chashnik, was one of Malevich’s closest collaborators. Read More →

Yasoi Kusama featured image

In 1965, Kusama erected the first of her now-famous immersive environments. Infinity Mirror Room – Phalli’s Field (Floor Show) fused her interests in repetition, sexual exploration, psychology, and perception by filling a roughly 25-square-meter mirrored room with a thick carpet of soft, twisting phalluses camouflaged in the artist’s signature polka dots.Read More →

Kelmscott Press

Morris believed his responsibility was “to revive a sense of beauty in home life, to restore the dignity of art to household decoration.Read More →

Eric Ravilious

He studied at the Eastbourne School of Art from 1919 to 1922 and at the Royal College of Art in London from 1922 to 1925 under Paul Nash and others.Read More →

Blue Woman Montreal

“Blue Gals” is a series by Montreal-based artist Etienne Dufresne featuring models with blue skin going about everyday activities. For this artist, shooting his strange portraits is a way to bring to life the characters he drew in school while growing up.Read More →

Erin O'Keefe

The wrongness of images, or our apperceptions of them: What appears to be a painting is actually a photograph. What appear to be two-dimensional painted lines, curves, rectangles, arabesques, planes of color, or abstract geometries with trompe l’oeil shadows are in fact three-dimensional objects carefully arranged, brightly illuminated, and flattened into a beguiling single plane by the lens of a camera.Read More →

Lust, heartbreak and suggestive sculpture

The sensual American graffitist Cy Twombly, who lived in Italy from the late 1950s until his death in 2011, lushly inscribed his epic canvases with love poetry – Shelley and Keats, Cavafy and Catullus. The work was like an abstract expressionist Valentine’s card.Read More →

View of James Bishop's 2014 exhibition

Painter James Bishop has died at age 93. His lyrical abstractions juxtapose fields of colour or expanses of primed and painted canvas. He often worked on found materials, displaying careful attention to his substrate’s surface. In an essay for our October 2008 issue, artist and critic Joe Fyfe responded to a retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago that centred Bishop’s work on paper. “Bishop’s paintings on paper arise from a carefully determined process and an openness to accident,” Fyfe writes. “Working on a small scale, often in series, he achieves a gentle grandeur.”Read More →

Ida Ekblad Norwegian artist

Ida Ekblad’s practise incorporates painting and sculpture but also poetry, filmmaking and performance. The NorwegianRead More →

The Chariot of Apollo by Odilon Redon 1905-16

Odilon Redon, the artist who at the age 73 outsold all but Marcel Duchamp at the 1913 Armory Show of “Modern French Art” in New York City.Read More →