Model by Charles John Noke featured image

He modelled vases (including Columbis and Diana) and figures from 1893 to 1898. (including Holbein and Rembrandt vases). With Cuthbert Bailey and John Slater, he experimented with the reproduction of Sung, Ming, and early Ch’ing dynasty blood-red rouge flambé and sang-de-boeuf glazes from the late 1890s to the early 1900sRead More →

Marblehead Pottery featured image

Herbert J. Hall founded the Marblehead Pottery in 1904 as one of several “handcraft shops” that offered occupational therapy to “nervously worn outpatients.” The shops specialised in hand-weaving, woodcarving, and metalwork, with pottery being the most popular.Read More →

William Bower Dalton ceramics

He was the principal of Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts from 1899 to 1919. He was the curator of the South London Art Gallery during and after this time. Dalton was just 31 years old when he arrived at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in 1899. He’d done well to land the position in such a competitive environment – there were 71 other candidates.Read More →

New Wave Clay featured image

Throughout the twentieth century, ceramics were widely divided into two sectors. Studio pottery, which was a reaction to the mass-produced wares of the industrial revolution, and fine art by contemporary artists, who just used clay in their practise but rejected many of their traditional codes of practice. The unprecedented increase in ceramic popularity over the last five years has helped create a new type of potter: a ceramic designer: a part-craftsman, a part-designer, a bridge between ceramic craft, collectable design and fine art.Read More →