danish

Mogens Koch featured image

In 1934, he set up his own design office. He designed the 1932 Safari chair, still in production today by Interna in Frederikssund (Denmark). He designed a range of objects, including furniture for Rasmussens Snedkerier, Ivan Schlechter, Cado, Danish CWS, and Interna; carpets; fittings; silver; and fabrics for use in the restoration of Danish churches. He published the book Modern Danish Arts — Craftsmanship (1948).Read More →

Dan Svarth featured image

Dan Svarth is a Danish designer. He studied at the KunsthÃ¥ndvrærkerskolen, Copenhagen, to 1967, furniture design, Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, to 1969. Read More →

Set of three silver brooches by Arno Malinowski

His jewellery designs of a kneeling deer, a dolphin in the rushes, and butterflies on a flower, which he created in 1937, were produced for many years. In 1940, he created the ‘Kingmark’ to commemorate King Christian’s seventieth birthday. It was mass-produced and worn by Danes to demonstrate their allegiance to Denmark and opposition to the German occupation. Read More →

Andreas Hansen featured image

He studied at the KunsthÃ¥ndvaerkerskolen, Copenhagen, to 1962 and Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademiets Møbelskole, Copenhagen to 1963.Read More →

Jörgen Kastholm featured image

Kastholm was apprenticed as a boy to a blacksmith and worked at that trade for five years in the United States before returning to Copenhagen to study design. Between 1954 – 1958 he studied at the Bygingsteknisk Skole, Frederick, under Arne Jacobsen. In 1959 the Grafisk Høskole. After graduation, he practised architecture and furniture design in Beirut.Read More →

Cylinda Line Teapot by Arne Jacobsen

In 1927, Jacobsen established his practice in Hellerup. He was Denmark’s first exponent of Functionalism, influenced by Modern architecture of the 1930s, such as Le Corbusier, Gunnar Asplund, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. His first significant assignment was the Bellavista housing complex in Copenhagen, which he completed between 1930 and 1934.Read More →

Bojensen Monkey

Kay Bojesen (1886-1958) was a Danish silversmith and designer. Most notably, his monkey, displayed at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from the 1950s to the 1960s, is widely accepted as a design classic.Read More →

Louis Poulsen Featured Image

The company began manufacturing in the 1920s. Poul Henningsen’s well-known ceiling lamp for Poulsen was put in Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Tugendhat residence in Brno from 1929 to 1939.Read More →

Bowls by Henning Koppel

Koppel had his debut as a sculptor at the Artists’ Authumn Exhibition in 1935 with an expressive portrait bust. He was also represented with drawings on several exhibitions. His best works as a sculptor are the busts of Valdemar and Jytte Koppel (1938 and 1942, both in black granite) and Tora Nordstrom Bonnier and Karl-Adam Bonnier (both 1944).Read More →

Nanny Ditzel and husband

Nanna Ditzel, a leading Danish 20th-century designer, had also worked in furniture, textiles and jewellery design for many decades and has been one of the few women designers in the country to achieve celebrity status.Read More →

Erik Magnussen featured image

Danish silversmith of Art Deco and Cubist works

Erik Magnussen was a silversmith and designer from Denmark. He lived in the United States from 1925 to 1939, first as artistic director of the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York City and subsequently with his workshop in Chicago and Los Angeles.Read More →

Flexible Shelf System

What happens when Benjamin Hubert’s LAYER partners with upcycled textile maker Really? An extremely clever, flexible shelving system for textile manufacturer Kvadrat called SHIFT. The wall system quickly goes from a flat acoustic panel to a display shelf in seconds making it perfect for retail spaces, exhibitions, or openings when display areas need to be changed up.Read More →

Grethe Meyer ceramics featured image

She worked on the editorial staff of The Building Manual from 1944 to 1955. She was a crucial figure in Borge Mogensen’s research on the standardisation of consumer product sizes, and she collaborated with him frequently. They created the Boligens Byggeskabe (BB) and resund cabinet-storage systems in 1957.Read More →

Dansk International - Design Firm

Dansk quickly gained a reputation for well-designed dinnerware that embodied the sophisticated postwar Scandinavian aesthetic of combining artisan traditions with industrial production. Read More →

Bottle Opener - Arne Petersen

At the Copenhagen firm C.C. Herman, Petersen learnt silver and goldsmithing methods. He joined the Georg Jensen Solvsmedie in 1948 and worked in the hollow-ware department until 1976. His 1975 Bottle Opener, made of stainless steel soldered with brass, received a lot of attention.
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Finn Lynggaard featured image

In 1958, he established his own workshop, making him a pioneer in the field of Danish studio glass. Deeply coloured flower designs on translucent backgrounds are a signature of his glasswork.Read More →

Hans and Lise Isbrand featured image

Lise and Hans Isbrand have shown up at the SE shows multiple times with intriguing and experimental prototypes. Their work, on the other hand, tends to be more focused on ordinary life. As a result, they are responsible for various fascinating workplace furniture, inventive culinary utensils, and other items.Read More →

Nesting Stool-Tables by Verner Panton featured image

Vernon Panton (1926 – 1998) Danish Architect & Designer. He was a master at transforming flowing forms into gorgeous plastic masterpieces. READ MORERead More →

Hans Wegner featured image

Organic Functionality, a modernist school emphasising Functionality, is a term used to define his style. With contributions by Poul Henningsen, Alvar Aalto, and Arne Jacobsen, this school of thought originated predominantly in Scandinavian countries.Read More →

Kay Fisk Silver

Kay Fisker (1893-1965) was a Danish architect and furniture designer, metalworker, and professionally active in Copenhagen.Read More →