type

Early studies for Metroblack, the first full typeface designed by Dwiggins.

Dwiggins was known for his “Metro” series of typefaces, the first designed specifically for newspaper headlines. He produced that in 1929 when he won the gold medal of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.Read More →

Typography, whether purposely unnoticed or at its most beautiful, is an art, even if some of us pay little attention to it. The Madrid-based design studio CESS created a typeface inspired by modern art itself for the 36 Days of Type project, which invited graphic artists and designers to design one letter or number each day. The result is the adorably named Artphabet, a striking, mostly hand-designed project that also serves as a lesson in 20th- and 21st-century art.Read More →

It helps to have an appropriate language to talk about typography.  The following is a glossary of some of the words and their definitions that are used to described typography.Read More →

Japanese Publication: Monthly Cosmopolitan. Aoyama Nozomi and Wakida Asuka (Cosmopolitan). 2015.Read More →

Town House motel sign

Motel signs are one of my favourite examples of recognisable American vernacular typography. Read More →

Benjamin Sherbow, a copywriter who honed his typographic skills and fervently learned the nuances of type and languageRead More →

Little is known about the early life of France’s most distinguished type designer Claude Garamond, though he is mentioned as being “at work” in the printing business early in the sixteenth century, Garamond was commissioned by the French monarch, Francis I, to cut a font of Greek letter which later became known as the “Royal Greek Type.” Read More →

Spock is my favourite characters from Star Trek.  If Spock were a designer what sort of Typography would appeal to him?  This theoretical perspective interested me as Spock is a scientist rather than a creative.Read More →

Movable type - Gutenberg

Sourced from Daily Press – Newport News Virginia 17 April 1939 The invention of movableRead More →

The difference between oblique and italic

Italics are probably the most common form of typographic emphasis and is used in both text and display settings.  True-drawn italics are usually a unique and separate design from their Roman brethren.  Aldus Manutius, a commercial printer, was looking for a way to fit more type onto a page and to reduce the price of his low-cost editions.Read More →

Arrow Design ‘Brand New Roman’ is a Fun Mashup of All the Corporate Logos You Know and Love BY Shaunacy Ferro. 

Hello Velocity Brand New Roman is not your average typeface. You’ll probably never find it in the drop-down menu of Microsoft Word or see it on a sign, but it’s instantly recognizable.Read More →

Do people still use Helvetica ? Today, we will see what designers say about the notorious font. Are you curious to find out how many hate it and how many love it? So am I. Let’s find out! Approximately 1000 years ago, the Chineseman Bi Sheng invented the mobile letter.Read More →

William Caslon Example of Greeking

Although it sounds like it ‘Greeking’ is not some weird sexual practice practised by the ancients.  ‘Greeking’ is a technique that originated in advertising where the potential ad copy or text for a new ad being developed is represented by non-words so that the viewer can focus on the overall design rather than getting caught up in the actual details of the text.Read More →

These posters by Robin Weissenborn are not new, they were designed in 2015 and awarded in an international poster competition. The graphic designer, who was studying at the prestigious Bauhaus university at the time, designed a series of posters using experimental typography and cool distorted perspectives.

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Let’s say you’re an operative with the CIA. Your agents are filing intelligence briefs toRead More →

Japanese designer Kosuke Takahashi has created an ingenious font that merges different typefaces to allowRead More →