British Designers ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง

“I am tired of good taste. I want to do everything wrong and get a result that is valid and of value as well.” Zandra Rhodes
Chritian Barman electric fan heater featured image

Christian Barman was a key first-generation British industrial designer during the interwar years. He is best known for his 1936 electric iron for HMV, which he started designing in 1933. He studied architecture at Liverpool University and ran his practice until Frank Pick invited him to join London Transport as a Publicity Officer in 1935.Read More →

HMV Convector heater featured image

Christian Barman’s 1934 HMV Electric Convector Heater is a classic example of Streamline Modern design. The heater’s stepped parabolic curves are both functional and beautiful. Even though it isn’t streamlined in the strictest sense, it still has the look of modern design.Read More →

Penguin Donkey designed by Riss Egon for Isokon Furniture Company

Jack Pritchard was one of the most prominent designers in Britain during the 20th century, creating iconic pieces like the bentwood dining table and the Penguin Donkey that can be found in top museums around the world today. Find out more about Jack Pritchard’s life and career by reading this profile of one of Britain’s most respected designers.Read More →

Lucienne and Robin Day

Lucienne Day was one of the most influential post-war British textile designers. She developed a unique style of pattern making. READ MORERead More →

Jaeger Clothing Fashion

During the twentieth century, a movement arose that advocated for clothing to be worn as part of a sensible, healthy lifestyle rather than only for fashion. These concepts sprang from the work of nineteenth-century fashion reformers, in the same way, that English writer Edward Carpenter popularised the open-toed leather sandal for men. Read More →

Geoffrey Harcourt featured image

Between 1960-61, he worked at Latham, Tyler and Jensen, Chicago, and with Jacob Jensen in Copenhagen; in 1961, opened his studio in London, specialising in furniture design; from 1962; began designing seating for Artifort, the Netherlands, who produced more than 20 models of his furniture designsRead More →

Moorcroft Pottery featured image

William Moorcroft started Moorcroft, a British art pottery manufacturer, in Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, in 1913.Read More →

Michael Cardew featured image

He learned to throw pottery from William Fishley Holland at the Braunton Pottery, North Devon, 1921โ€”22. In 1923, he met Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada at St. Ives.Read More →

Selwyn Image featured image

In 1873, Image was ordained a priest in the Church of England. From 1882, he was associated with A.H. Mackmurdo in forming the Century Guild and designed the first issue (1884) of the Guildโ€™s publication, The Hobby Horse. Read More →

Unit One was a British avant-garde community of architects and fine artists were created by designer, artist, and teacher Paul Nash to encourage Modernism in art and architecture in England. Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, and Ben Nicholson were among the group’s most prominent members, as were the architects’ Wells Coates and Colin Lucas. Read More →

Frank Brangwyn featured image

From 1882, through his friendship with Arthur H. Mackmurdo, he worked as a draftsman and designed tapestries for William Morris; in 1885, he rented a studio and showed his work for the first time at the Royal Academy; in 1895, he executed murals for the entrance of and a frieze in Siegfried Bingโ€™s shop Lโ€™Art Nouveau, ParisRead More →

He was influenced by the sculptural simplicity of German postwar design, such as that of Braun. He redesigned products for Kenwood, including their food mixer. Read More →

Alastair Morton textile

Morton joined his family’s Morton Sundour Fabrics in 1931 and oversaw the company’s first screen-printed fabrics. He was the artistic director and principal designer of Edinburgh Weavers in Carlisle, which was established in 1928 as Morton Sundour’s creative design unit from 1932 to 1935. From the 1930s, he was a supporter of the Modern movement, commissioning works from well-known painters and artists.Read More →

The Yorkshire Coast featured image

She was a juror of the 1922 Carnegie International competition, Pittsburgh. She designed both the shapes and the decorations for the 1933โ€”34 Circus range of tableware produced by Arthur J. Wilkinson, Burslem, under Clarice Cliffโ€™s supervision.Read More →

Roger Fry Garment featured image

Roger Fry was a British painter, writer, art critic, designer, and lecturer. He was born in London. Between 1885 – 1890, he studied natural sciences, Cambridge University, and Acadรฉmie Julian, Paris, 1892. Read More →

Clyne Farquharson featured image

In the 1930s, Farquharson was a major contributor to the design of British glassware. His documented career in glass began in 1935 with Arches, an engraved design on glass produced by John Walsh Walsh, where he produced other cut-crystal glassware as its head designer 1935โ€”51. Read More →

Peter McCulloch design fabric 1965

In the early 1960s, he taught at the Falmouth School of Art in Cornwall. Some of his textiles incorporated contrasting colors in small dots suggesting printed circuitry, as in his 1963 Cruachan fabric produced by Hull Traders.Read More →

Art of Zandra Rhodes featured image

Zandra Rhodes is known for her creativity and talent worldwide, and it is images and impressions from all around the world that has so often inspired her art. Images have met her eye and been interpreted through her own very personal vision, boldly pushing their way into the highest levels of fashion, from an aerial view of a Mexican sombrero to the wiggle of the Great Wall of China.Read More →

John Ruskin social critic featured image

John Ruskin (1819 – 1900) was a British social critic and writer. His influential books The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849) and The Stones of Venice (1851โ€”53) show his interest in architecture, particularly the Gothic style. Read More →

Brian Asquith (1930 – 2008) was one of the principal figures in British silversmithing during the 20th century, now regarded as the industryโ€™s heroic age. Read More →