Austrian Designer 🇦🇹

“The home must not be a mere effective machine. It must offer comfort, rest, and coziness (soothing to the eye, stimulating to the soul). There are no puritan principles in good interior decoration..” Josef Frank
Universal Typeface - Herbert Bayer

The universal typeface, 1925, was a geometric alphabet based on bar and circle and was designed by Herbert Bayer (1900) to function efficiently in a technological society. Bayer rejected the “archaic and complicated gothic alphabet” which lingered in the most scientifically advanced society of its time, Germany of the first world war period and the postwar era. Read More →

Luce Rie Ceramics

Lucie Rie (1902 – 1995) was an Austrian-born British ceramicist. Between 1922-26, she studied fine art, at Kunstgewerbeschule, Vienna, under Michael Powolny. Her most famous works are vases, bottles, and bowls inspired by Japan. Lucie Rie Footed Bowl c. 1951, owned by publisher Susan Shaw. Gold medal for work in the Austrian pavilion at the 1937 Paris ‘Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques clans la Vie Moderne’ Exhibition of her work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.Read More →

Enorme Telephone - Ettore Sottsass

Although trained and active as an architect, Sottsass secured a permanent place in pop culture with his designs of everyday items. From 1957, he was a consultant designer at Olivetti, where he designed computers, adding machines, typewriters, and systems furniture. Read More →

Shrine of the Book, 1965, by the architects Frederick John Kiesler (1890-1965) and Armand Phillip Bartos (1910-2005)

Frederick John Kiesler, an Austrian-American architect, theoretician, theatre designer, artist, and sculptor, was born Friedrich Jacob Kiesler in Czernowitz, Austria-Hungary Empire (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine), in 1890. 1965 saw his passing.Read More →

Her family settled in the USA when she was in her teens and took the Carnegie name. In 1909, with a friend, she opened a tiny dress and hat shop, New York, known as Carnegie—Ladies’ Hatter.Read More →

Frederick Kiegler - featured image

From 1920, he collaborated briefly with Adolf Loos. in the 1920s. He designed theatre sets and interiors; in 1923, he joined the group De Sujl and, in the same year, developed the design of his ‘Endless’ house and theatre. Read More →

Gerhard Haderer Illustration Shark Selfie

Haderer had even gone to court over one of his works, “The Life of Jesus,” which sparked heated reactions across the country, particularly among Catholics. He was able to change the verdict a few months later, after being sentenced to a six-month ban.Read More →

Franz Schuster featured image

He was active in Vienna from the 1910s. As part of a municipal program to construct workers’ homes after World War I, he designed a small row in the Viennese suburb Laaer Berg. At this time, he also produced his modular stacking furniture.Read More →

Porsche 356 designed by Erwin Komeda

In 1934, he joined Ferdinand Porsche’s design bureau in Stuttgart and began work on the styling of the Volkswagen, the people’s car.Read More →

Richard Neutra

Richard Josef Neutra (1892 – 1970) was an Austrian American artist and designer. He was born in Vienna and lived in Los Angeles and southern California for much of his life.Read More →

He began painting on glass at a young age and worked as a stained glass artist in Munich. He worked in many workshops in Paris starting in 1919, including Jacques Gruber’s. He saw that electric illumination was nothing more than a transformation of oil lamps and candlesticks. He made his first lamps in the style of Romanesque church windows. Read More →

Shoe Chair featured image

Birgit Jürgenssen works with constellations and interactions influenced by gender-specific projections, physicality, and identification. Her affiliation in the feminist-oriented group DIE DAMEN (with Evelyne Egerer, Birgit Jürgenssen, ONA B., Ingeborg Strobl, and Lawrence Weiner) aided her in placing her objects between everyday life and role play. Read More →

Hans Hollein featured image

Hollein was born in Vienna and graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna in 1956. He studied in Clemens Holzmeister’s master class. He studied at the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1959 and subsequently at the University of California, Berkeley. Read More →

Biscuit Tin designed by Emanuel Josef Margold

He was a prolific designer of furniture, glass, and porcelain in Darmstadt.Read More →

Wiener Werkstätte Decorative arts in the Musée d'Orsa

Wiener Werkstatte was based on the ideals of the guild system & developed a direct relationship between designers and craftspeople. READ MORE >Read More →

Valerie Wieselthier featured image

She was the head of the Wiener Werkstätte’s ceramic workshop. She worked in a highly distinctive style with coarse modelling and drip-glass effects. Read More →

Ceramic container designer by Dagobert Peche featured image

He devised wholly new, amusing forms, frequently in simple materials like tole and cardboard; the conditions caused by World War I dictated the use of low-cost raw materials. Read More →

Friedl Dicker featured image

Friedl Dicker was an Austrian architect and furniture, interior, and textile designer, she was born in Vienna. Read More →

Werkstätten Hagenauer featured image

Werkstätten Hagenauer were Vienna-based Austrian metalsmiths. Over its nearly ninety-year history, it was a family business in Vienna that produced fine, handcrafted objects for decoration and use. The workshop closed in 1987, but the company’s retail premises on Vienna’s Opernring, which opened in 1938, is still open today as a museum and shop.Read More →

Bruno Pollack stacking chair

Pollack invented a tubular steel stacking chair, model RP7, which was manufactured from c1932 and revolutionised auditorium seating with its stacking concept. Cox, a British furniture maker, was embroiled in a legal battle with rival Pel in 1934 over the Rp6 stacking chair, which Pel had bought the rights from Pollack.Read More →