Graphic Design

Early studies for Metroblack, the first full typeface designed by Dwiggins.

Dwiggins was known for his “Metro” series of typefaces, the first designed specifically for newspaper headlines. He produced that in 1929 when he won the gold medal of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.Read More →

God Save the Queen Cover

The realities of dissatisfied working-class urban teenagers with little hope of a job, housing, or a meaningful future shaped Punk in the mid-1970s. Read More →

William Caxton learned about the mystery of printing in the Low Countries, and it was in Bruges that he translated a French work, ” The Tales of Troy, ” through his printing press.Read More →

Penguin Book Covers

This sofa is designed in a so-called minimalist style that is basic and unadorned. Throughout the late 1980s, this emergent style had a significant impact on design in Europe. The sofa in question results from a significant collaboration between a talented young designer and a manufacturer committed to promoting new design.Read More →

Herbert Bayer - Inspiration and Process in Design featured image

Herbert Bayer (1900–1985) was one of the most influential graphic designers of the twentieth century, with a prolific career spanning more than six decades and two continents. As a student and teacher at the Bauhaus, he used geometry, photomontage, functional analysis, and simplified typography to forge a new approach to graphic design. This book explores the evolution of Bayer’s design process, from his student works featuring hand lettering to mechanically printed typography and hyperreal photo illustrations.Read More →

Universal Typeface - Herbert Bayer

The universal typeface, 1925, was a geometric alphabet based on bar and circle and was designed by Herbert Bayer (1900) to function efficiently in a technological society. Bayer rejected the “archaic and complicated gothic alphabet” which lingered in the most scientifically advanced society of its time, Germany of the first world war period and the postwar era. Read More →

Aldus Manuitius featured image

The type in which this sentence is written is called “italic”. Aldus Manutius the man who invented it died almost 500 years ago and his type is still in use.  Today publishing a manuscript is almost instantaneous, a new best seller can be placed on Amazon and I can buy a copy minutes later.  To look at the books which came off the Venitian presses of Aldus Manutius is a strange experience.Read More →

Alexander Girard (1907 – 1993) was a man of many design talents. He trained asRead More →

Herb Lubalin

Renowned American graphic designer, Herb Lubalin, best known for his collaborations with Ralph Ginzburg on the magazines Eros, Fact and  Avant Garde,  is regarded as one of the seminal designers of the 20th century. The, 17 March 2018, will mark what would have been Lubalin’s 100th birthday.Read More →

Milton Glaser featured image

Co-founder of Push Tin Studios.

The colourful posters of designer-illustrator Milton Glaser epitomise an era for the Woodstock generation. His psychedelic ‘American Sixties style’ was a synthesis of various influences ranging from Surrealism to Islamic painting.Read More →

It helps to have an appropriate language to talk about typography.  The following is a glossary of some of the words and their definitions that are used to described typography.Read More →

All through the 1980s, a disgruntled Department of Defense analyst adorned his daily desk calendar with all sorts of illustrations and commentary on the news . The majority of the entries focus on domestic politics and international affairs, providing (with the exception of 1988) a day-by-day view of the Reagan Administration and the waning years of the Cold War.Read More →

William Dwiggins featured image

Dwiggins was born in Martinsville, Ohio in 1880, he had studied East in Chicago, and then he moved to Boston.  Between the years 1917-1918, he became the acting director of the Harvard University Press.  He also worked for the Yale Universty Press, designing jackets, endpapers, bindings and posters.Read More →

Never Stop Learning

It’s critical to keep up with the latest apps, technology, and trends in the fast-changing world of visual communication, but it’s also critical to have a good understanding of design as a subject of study with a long history of lessons to learn. With that in mind, here are a few must-have books for any designer. The books are significant, educational, and reasonably priced.Read More →

Wolff Olins featured image

Wolff Olins has offices in London, Madrid, Lisbon, New York, San Francisco, and Tokyo, and has been a leading British design agency for nearly four decades, with a special focus on corporate identity and branding. It is a subsidiary of Omnicom Group.Read More →

Jacqueline Groag Textiles

Jacqueline Groag (1903 – 1986) was a Czech textile designer and ceramicist. Born in Prague she studied in Vienna at the Kunstgewerbeschule during the 1920s. In 1937 she moved to Paris where she designed dress prints for Jeanne Lanvin, Elsa Schiparelli and others.Read More →

Barcelona-based multidisciplinary graphic designer Andrés Reisinger renders still lifes, interiors and design objects in 3D with a clean, modern aesthetic.Read More →

Motion Design: True Detective 3 Opening Title

We are featuring a collaborative work from Mill+ and Antibody with Nic Pizzolato to create the opening title sequence for the long-awaited third season of HBO’s ‘True Detective’.Read More →