constructivism

Constructivism was an artistic and architectural philosophy that originated in Russia beginning in 1915 by Vladimir Tatlin and Alexander Rodchenko. Abstract and austere, constructivist art aimed to reflect modern industrial society and urban space. The movement rejected decorative stylization in favour of the industrial assemblage of materials. Constructivists were in favour of art for propaganda and social purposes and were associated with Soviet socialism, the Bolsheviks and the Russian avant-garde.

In the early days of the Bolshevik revolution artists in their teens and early twenties passionately connected themselves to the collectivist goals of communism. Their motives certainly combined idealism with opportunism – a chance to ride the aesthetic revolution to fame on the political upheaval.Read More →

Gustav Klutsis Book Cover

Gustav Klutsis was a Latvian artist and graphic, poster and applied arts designer. Born in 1895 Klutsis was a devoted supporter of the Boshevik regime and he was a member of the communist party. He was considered the pioneer of photomontage in the Soviet Union and an acclaimed graphic designer and painter. Klutsis was one of the earliest artists to use the photomontage technique for visual propaganda.  He subsequently emerged as a brilliant creator of Stalinist political art.Read More →

František Zelenka Terezín 1944 theatre props

František Zelenka (1896 – 1942) was a Czech architect and stage and graphic designer. He was born in Prague. Zelenka’s career in the theatre was initiated by K.H. Hilar, the National Theatre director in Prague in 1926.Read More →

Russian Constructivism

One of the 20th century’s most influential movements amounted to nothing less than an attackRead More →

Propaganda today may come in a much more subtle and insidious form, but once notRead More →