Jewellery

Judith Leiber featured image

Judith Leiber (1921 – 2018) was a prolific designer whose fanciful minaudiรจres had accessorised royalties, first ladies, and film stars, and entered the collections of art the Metropolitan Museum of Art. While her couture handbagsโ€”carried by celebrities such as Greta Garbo, Elizabeth Taylor, Claudette Colbert, Bjรถrk, and Barbara Waltersโ€”are widely regarded as works of art, Leiber preferred the word “artisan” to “artist.”Read More →

Harry Bertoia featured image

Harry Bertoia was a sculptor, printmaker, jeweller, and furniture designer. He was born in San Lorenzo, Udine, and worked in the United States professionally. During World War Two he worked with Ray and Charles Eames on moulded-plywood technology. He worked primarily as a sculptor from the mid-1950s onwards. His sculpture was prominently featured in many of Eero Saarinen’s buildings.Read More →

Alma Eikerman black and white

Alma Eikerman (1908 – 1995) was an American jewellery designer and silversmith. Eikerman was born in Pratt, Kansas, and graduated from Kansas State College in Emporia with a B.Sc. in 1934 and an M.Sc. in 1942.ย Read More →

Jean Schlumberger french jewellery designer

Jean Schlumberger (1907โ€“1987), one of the most accomplished artists of the twentieth century, produced objects of unrivalled beauty. He was a man of exquisite taste, a jeweller who created extraordinary jewelled statements with a feeling of depth and life. Read More →

Herman Junger Brooch featured image

Hermann Junger was one of the best goldsmiths in Germany. His creative jewellery had a big impact not only in Germany, but also all over Europe and the U.S. He studied at the Staatliche Zeichenakademie, Hanau.Read More →

Louis Rault coin featured image

Louis Rault (1847 – 1903) was a French Sculptor, engraver, silversmith and jewellery designer.Between 1868 and 1875, Rault worked in the Boucheron workshop on the Place Vendรดme in Paris. At the end of the nineteenth century, he set up a workshop where he produced silver and jewellery in the Art Nouveau style.Read More →

Pennino Retro Citrine Spray

In 1928, Oreste Pennino registered a series of 12 trademarks used from 1926 and illustrating signs of the Zodiac. The firm produced bracelets, rings, clips, earrings, lockets, and brooches and, from 1947, watches and watchcases. Its wares were designed in the forms of flower bouquets, fruit, leaves, and trees in rose, pale and dark blue, and violet. The firm closed in 1961.Read More →

Bowls by Henning Koppel

Koppel had his debut as a sculptor at the Artists’ Authumn Exhibition in 1935 with an expressive portrait bust. He was also represented with drawings on several exhibitions. His best works as a sculptor are the busts of Valdemar and Jytte Koppel (1938 and 1942, both in black granite) and Tora Nordstrom Bonnier and Karl-Adam Bonnier (both 1944).Read More →

Marcel Boucher featured image

In 1925 Marcel Boucher arrived in New York from France and went to work for Cartier as a jeweller. Eventually, he leaves there and makes shoe buckles, possibly for Trifari. At this time, jewellery is all flat, without high modulation. Marcel started his firm in the Thirties, and his first line is an extraordinary group of bird pins made with coloured stones and bright enamels. Nothing like this has ever been done before.Read More →

Maison Gripoix costume jewellry

Maison Gripoix, a French costume jeweller, was located in Paris. Around 1890, Maison Gripoix sold glass beads and buttons wholesale. Subsequently, specialised in handmade imitations of precious and semi-precious jewels, including parures for Sarah Bernhardt.Read More →

Boucheron featured image

Boucheron was a French court jeweller with branches in Paris, London, Biarritz, and New York. Founded by Frederic Boucheron (1858). Famous for elaborate diamond jewellery during the late 19th century. Expensive novelties shown at international exhibitions in Paris (1867 and 1900) and Philadelphia (1876) attracted wealthy customers (mainly American).Read More →

Alphonse Fouquet featured image

His early jewellery was in neo-Greek and neo-Renaissance styles, indistinguishable from Vever, Fossin, Morel, and Mellerio.Read More →

Set of three silver brooches by Arno Malinowski

His jewellery designs of a kneeling deer, a dolphin in the rushes, and butterflies on a flower, which he created in 1937, were produced for many years. In 1940, he created the ‘Kingmark’ to commemorate King Christian’s seventieth birthday. It was mass-produced and worn by Danes to demonstrate their allegiance to Denmark and opposition to the German occupation.ย Read More →

Harold Stabler tea set featured image

Harold Stabler’s lengthy, illustrious career began in the Arts and Crafts movement and extended into the modernist era. Over the 50 years or so he devoted to the arts, he created an astounding diversity of highly regarded pieces, both unique and mass-produced, in various mediums and styles.ย Read More →

Opera Glasses - Lucien Falize

Lucien Falize (1838- 1897) was French goldsmith and jeweller. He was active in Paris and son of Alexis Falize, father of Andre Falize. When his father retired in 1876, Lucien assumed directorship of the family business. He attempted to expand the business by showing at 1878 Paris ‘Exposition Universelle’ and becoming partners with Germain Bapst. In 1892, the partnership was dissolved. Read More →

Bapst et Falize featured image

In 1752, Georges-Michel Bapst became King Louis XV’s jeweller and took over the direction of his father-in-shop, law’s Georges-Frรฉdรฉric Stras. (Stras invented ‘strass,’ a colourless glass paste commonly used for jewellery in the 18th and 19th centuries.)Read More →

Caroline Broadhead featured image

She used coloured ivory in her early work. In 1977, she started producing necklaces with bound thread. In 1978, she designed a wood- or silver-framed bracelet with tufts of nylon through which the hand could be squeezed; she was a leader in the new jewellery movement that began in 1968, and she used plastic, cloth, paper, and rubber instead of precious metal.Read More →

Carlo Giuliano Ring

Carlo Guiliano was an Italian jeweller and goldsmith who was born in Naples and worked in London. In 1860, Guiliano settled in London and worked for Harry Emanuel. He collaborated with Castellani Italian Jewellers on at least one piece of jewellery. In the archaeological or Etruscan style, he was a talented jeweller. He developed his distinctive style, which was copied a lot in the 1880s and 1890s. The Italian-born Pasquale Novissimo, Guiliano’s assistant, created such delicate enamel decoration on Guillano ‘s pieces that they were difficult to copy.Read More →

Nanny Ditzel and husband

Nanna Ditzel, a leading Danish 20th-century designer, had also worked in furniture, textiles and jewellery design for many decades and has been one of the few women designers in the country to achieve celebrity status.Read More →

Borje Rajalin featured image

Borje Rajalin is a Finnish Jewellery Designer.

Rajalin worked at Bertel Gardberg’s silversmith from 1952 – 1956.ย  His design work included technical equipment, plastic fittings, cutlery, stainless steel table and cookware and with Anti Nurmesniemi in 1972 a train for the Helsinki Railway.ย  They collaborated with station designers to make the metro stations modern and chic.ย  Rajalin produced silver designs for Bertel Gardberg and jewellery for Kalevala Koru.ย  He taught at Taideeteollinen Oppilaitos and was the director of Taidetelinen Ammattikoulu in Helsinki.Read More →