art nouveau

Art Nouveau (/ˌɑːrt nuːˈvoʊ, ˌɑːr/; French: [aʁ nuvo]) is an international style of art, architecture, and applied art, especially the decorative arts, known in different languages by different names: Jugendstil in German, Stile Liberty in Italian, Modernisme català in Catalan, etc. In English, it is also known as the Modern Style (British Art Nouveau style). The style was most popular between 1890 and 1910It was a reaction against the academic art, eclecticism and historicism of 19th-century architecture and decoration. It was often inspired by natural forms such as the sinuous curves of plants and flowers. Other characteristics of Art Nouveau were a sense of dynamism and movement, often given by asymmetry or whiplash lines, and the use of modern materials, particularly iron, glass, ceramics and later concrete, to create unusual forms and larger open spaces. (Wikipedia)

Clément Mére furniture

Clément Mère was born in Bayonne and active in Paris. He was a French painter, table-builder, artist and furniture builder.

He studied painting with Jean-Léon Gérôme at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris.Read More →

Main building of the École de Nancy

Between 1890 and 1914, the École de Nancy, or Nancy School, was a group of Art Nouveau artisans and designers based in Nancy, France. The furniture designer Louis Majorelle, the cabinet maker and glass artist Jacques Grüber, the glass and furniture designer Émile Gallé, and the Daum crystal factory were important contributors.Read More →

Louis Majorelle featured image

Majorelle took over the family cabinetmaking and ceramics business in Nancy in 1879. In the late 1880s, he began designing Modern furniture. Working in the Art Nouveau style, Majorelle was the most dynamic practitioner of the School of Nancy. By mechanising his factory, he produced significant quantities of highly decorated commercial furniture and more elaborate pieces using expensive materials such as mahogany, burr walnut, and ormolu. Read More →

Charles Plumet furniture

In the year 1861, Charles Plumet was born. As an architect, he built structures in the mediaeval and early French Renaissance styles. He worked on interiors and furniture designs in Art Nouveau styles with Tony Selmersheim (1871–1971). Between 1896 and 1901, Charles Plumet joined l’Art dans Tout (Art in Everything), an association of architects, painters, and sculptors who consciously attempted to renew decorative art, adopting styles ranging from adapted mediaeval to Art Nouveau. Read More →

Musée des Arts Décoratifs

The Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Museum of Decorative Arts) is a museum dedicated to the exhibition and conservation of decorative arts. Located at 107 Rue de Rivoli in the city’s 1st arrondissement, the museum occupies the northwest wing of the Palais du Louvre, known as the Pavillon de Marsan (Marsan Pavilion). With more than one million objects in its collection, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs is the largest museum of decorative arts in continental Europe.Read More →

Manuel Orazi - Loïe Fuller

Manuel Orazi was a Spanish illustrator, a lithographer who contributed notable Art Nouveau posters of the last quarter of the nineteenth century. He designed the 1884 Théodora poster for Sarah Bernhardt with Gorguet. Others of his posters were for Peugeot bicycles, the opera Aben Hamet and, in the form of an old torn manuscript, for the opera Thaïs by Jules Massenet.
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Jugendstil Brooch Featured Image

Art Nouveau was an international style of design and architecture.

Idiosyncratic and romantic the Art Nouveau style derived from the vestiges of academic classicism of the École des Beauz-Arts, Paris and the study of plant forms. Between 1880 and 1910, the Art Nouveau movement was influential throughout Europe and to a lesser degree in the United States. The following are 10 beautifully crafted examples of jewellery design in this style.Read More →