Pierre Jeaneret featured image

Pierre Jeanneret (1896 – 1967) was a Swiss architect and builder. He was a talented painter, artist, and architect as a young student, greatly inspired by Charles-Édouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier), his cousin and life mentor. From 1916 to 1918, he served in the Swiss Army as a cyclist.Read More →

Sven Markelius Chairs

Sven Markeilus (1889- 1972) was a Swedish Architect, Town Planner and textile designer born in Stockholm.

He taught in Stockholm and at Yale University. In the 1950s, Markelius designed simple wooden furniture and printed fabrics with Astrid Sampe, produced by Nordiska in Stockholm.Read More →

Griglia Table Lamps

Adalberto Dal Lago is an Italian architect and designer: born and active Milan. He was an assistant, Facolta di Architettura, Politecnico di Milano from 1964-70 and subsequently chair of interior design and then of the elements of composition. He published books on design and Modern architecture. The European Council commissioned him and architect Marco Zanus to publish a postwar European design book. Read More →

John Eberson - Atmospheric Theatre Design

John Eberson was an american designer who was known for his cinema décors. One of his earliest, the 1923 Majestic Theatre in Houston, Texas, was a loosely recreated garden of a late-Renaissance palazzo in Italy. Through his workshop Michelangelo Studios, he was was successful at producing elaborate plasterwork for his theatre décors in Spanish, Moorish, Dutch, Chinese and other styles.Read More →

Daniela Puppa black and white portrait

From 1977 to 1983, he worked as the chief editor of the design magazine Modo and as a consultant for the fashion magazine Donna. She designed interiors for Driade, Gianfranco Ferré, Montres and GFF Duty Free, Fontana Arte, Granciclismo sports machines, and Morassutti/Metropolis, as well as serving as an image and product consultant for the Croff/Rinascente chain. Read More →

Walter Gropius

Walter Gropius (1883 – 1969) was an architect born in Germany in the early twentieth century who contributed to the founding of the Bauhaus School. He lived in the United States after 1937 and taught at Harvard University, where he continued to defend the principles of Bauhaus, especially the use of functional materials and clean geometric designs.Read More →

Saarinen Houses - featured image

They are architecture’s most famous father-son duo: Eero, the younger Saarinen, designer of such masterpieces as the TWA Terminal Building at Kennedy Airport, and his father Eliel, celebrated for triumphs such as the art nouveau railway station in Helsinki. Lesser known, but no less impressive, are their houses, which, regardless of style, share a belief in architecture as a total work of art.Read More →

Hans Poelzig was a German architect and designer, he was born in Berlin. Between 1888-95, studied Technische Hochschule, Berlin Charlottenburg and Technische Hocschule, Berlin, under Karl Schäffer.

Between 1899-1916, he worked in his own office in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland) and, 1900-16, taught at the Kunst- und Kunstgewerbeschule (after 1911, called the Akademe für Kunst und Kunstgewerbe) in Breslau, where he was director from 1903Read More →

Pierre Vago Sketch featured image

Pierre Vago was a Hungarian Architect and designer. He studied at the École Spéciale d’Architecture, Paris.

He settled in France in 1928, where he was editor-in-chief on three issues of the review L’Architecture d’aujourd’hui. After World War 2, he was active in reviving the journal and set up his architecture office. In 1948 he left the journal, and it was in 1948 that he became a member of UAM (Union des Artistes Modernes). He built the Basicila de Saint-Pi X (with architect Pierre Pinsard and engineer Eugéne Freysinnet) in Lourdes.Read More →