Glassmaker

Ulla Forsell

Ulla Forsell was born in 1944 and studied at the College of Art and DesignRead More →

Dominick Labino featured image

He began his work as an instrument builder for the Bacharach Instrument Company in Pittsburgh. He then moved on to Owens-Illinois Glass Company, where he developed a lifetime interest in glass. He established small laboratories to create new glass batches and fabricate small glass objects while in command of the Owens-Illinois Glass Company milk-bottle plant. Read More →

Harvey Littleton Glassware

Between 1939-42 and 1946-47, he studied at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, receiving a bachelor’s degree in design. In 1941 and 1949-51, he studied Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, receiving a master’s degree in ceramics. In 1945, he was a student at the Brighton School of Art, Brighton, under Nora Braden’s tutelage.Read More →

Lino Tagliapietra glassware

From 1956, Tagliapietra taught glassmaking with Archimede Seguso and Nane Ferro; 1966—68, designed glass for Venini, Murano; until 1968, for Murrina; from 1968, taught glassmaking at Haystack School and Pilchuck School, Stanwood, Washington.
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Soichiro Sasakura featured image

He worked for Sasaki Glass, for which he designed the 1988 San Marino glassware range.Read More →

Sam Herman featured image

He studied sculpture at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, under Leo Steppern; in 1966, glass making with Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino; in 1966, Edinburgh College of Art; in 1967, Royal College of Art, London.Read More →

Around 1975, Moje began cutting the rods into thin wafers or strips and fusing them in a kiln. The pieces would then be cut again and re-fused to create rhythmic patterns of vibrant colour. In 1976, Moje returned to Hamburg after living in Danzinger Strasse. Read More →

Vase-sculpture ‘The Apple’ Designed by Ingeborg Lundin for Orrefors

Ingeborg Lundin (1921 – 1991) was a Swedish Glassware Designer. Between 1941 – 1946 she studied at Konstaackskolan and Tekniska Skolan, Stockholm.Read More →

Benny Motzfeldt (1909-95), vases for Randsfjord and Plus

Motzfeldt is best known for her glass creations. Her work is on show at the National Museum of Art, Architecture, and Design in Oslo, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Kunstindustrimuseum in Copenhagen, the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, and the Frauenau Glass Museum in Germany (donation Wolfgang Kermer). Read More →

Etsuko Nishi Japanese Glass Designer

Etsuko Nishi is a Japanese Glass Designer. She is a leading expert in pâte de verre, one of the oldest and most difficult glass-making forms. The desired shape is first made of clay, which is used as the basis for the mould. The glass powder is then mixed with a special type of paste, and the mixture is then placed in the mould and then fired.Read More →

Boehm Glassware featured image

Boehm joined Rosenthal in 1966. His limited-edition Reticelli range illustrated his interest in Italian glass by incorporating cotton twist threads in the molten glass-like 17th-century Venetian vessels. Read More →

Murano glassware was historically decorated with opulent rubies and gold and fanciful forms in vibrant colours. He hired freelance designers like Martinuzzi and Fulvio Bianconi regularly. Gio Ponti from 1927, Carlo Scarpa from 1932, Eugene Berman from 1951, Ken Scott from 1951, Franco Albini from 1954, and Massimo Vignelli from 1956 were the designers he commissioned.Read More →

Teruo Yamada Japanese Glassware

His work was shown at 1980 ‘Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition,’ Tokyo; 1981 and 1990 ‘Glass in Japan,’ Tokyo; 1985 ‘New Glass in Japan,’ Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe; 1987 ‘The Art of Contemporary Japanese Studio Glass,’ Heller Gallery, New York; 1991 (V) Triennale of the Japan Glass Art Crafts Association, Heller Gallery.Read More →

Main building of the École de Nancy

Between 1890 and 1914, the École de Nancy, or Nancy School, was a group of Art Nouveau artisans and designers based in Nancy, France. The furniture designer Louis Majorelle, the cabinet maker and glass artist Jacques Grüber, the glass and furniture designer Émile Gallé, and the Daum crystal factory were important contributors.Read More →

George Sakier featured image

George Sakier (1897 – 1965) was a multifaceted artist who worked as an interior designer,Read More →

Vicke Lindstrand featured image

He worked at Kariskrona Porslinsfabrik from 1935 to 1936; at Upsala-Ekeby from 1936 to 1950 (as art director from 1943 to 1950) Kosta Boda glassworks from 1950 to 1973, where he was design director while also maintaining his studio in Arhus. Often, his free-form work was engraved.Read More →

Set of Ten Holmgaard Glassby Per Lütken

Lütken was the principal designer at Kastrup & Holmegard Glasverk from 1942 to 1945, where he adopted his predecessor Jacob Bang’s Modern shapes. In the 1950s, he implemented considerable improvements in manufacturing and aesthetic at Holmegard, inspired by the Triennali di Milano. His pieces featured fluid forms in light-coloured glass, some of which had satin-finish etching. He used heated metal to sculpt created glass.Read More →

Finn Lynggaard featured image

In 1958, he established his own workshop, making him a pioneer in the field of Danish studio glass. Deeply coloured flower designs on translucent backgrounds are a signature of his glasswork.Read More →

Willy Johansson Glassware

His father was at the Hadelands Glassverk, Jevnaker, where Johansson joined the glassmaking workshop in 1936. He was best known for the white rim on his clear or smoked glassware.Read More →

Chihuly Glass example featured image

Dale Chihuly is an American Glass Designer born in Tacoma, Washington. He is one of the most respected glass artists in the United States. Read More →