danish designers 🇩🇰 (Page 2)

“Iconic design is a combination of simplicity, aesthetics and functionality brought to life through skilful work with the highest quality materials..” Carl Hansen & Sons
Klint Kaare featured image

Kaare Klint – Danish furniture designer. The Danes were greatly influenced by Germany’s Bauhaus movement in the early part of the twentieth century. Read More →

Set of three silver brooches by Arno Malinowski

His jewellery designs of a kneeling deer, a dolphin in the rushes, and butterflies on a flower, which he created in 1937, were produced for many years. In 1940, he created the ‘Kingmark’ to commemorate King Christian’s seventieth birthday. It was mass-produced and worn by Danes to demonstrate their allegiance to Denmark and opposition to the German occupation. Read More →

Andreas Hansen featured image

He studied at the Kunsthåndvaerkerskolen, Copenhagen, to 1962 and Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademiets Møbelskole, Copenhagen to 1963.Read More →

Jörgen Kastholm featured image

Kastholm was apprenticed as a boy to a blacksmith and worked at that trade for five years in the United States before returning to Copenhagen to study design. Between 1954 – 1958 he studied at the Bygingsteknisk Skole, Frederick, under Arne Jacobsen. In 1959 the Grafisk Høskole. After graduation, he practised architecture and furniture design in Beirut.Read More →

Cylinda Line Teapot by Arne Jacobsen

The Cylinda Line featured a close design connection among all aspects and the consistency of features throughout, including logo and packaging. It was designed over three years by International Style architect Jacobsen in collaboration with its manufacturer, Stelton. Read More →

Cylinda Line Teapot by Arne Jacobsen

In 1927, Jacobsen established his practice in Hellerup. He was Denmark’s first exponent of Functionalism, influenced by Modern architecture of the 1930s, such as Le Corbusier, Gunnar Asplund, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. His first significant assignment was the Bellavista housing complex in Copenhagen, which he completed between 1930 and 1934.Read More →

Bojensen Monkey

Kay Bojesen (1886-1958) was a Danish silversmith and designer. Most notably, his monkey, displayed at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from the 1950s to the 1960s, is widely accepted as a design classic.Read More →

Louis Poulsen Featured Image

The company began manufacturing in the 1920s. Poul Henningsen’s well-known ceiling lamp for Poulsen was put in Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Tugendhat residence in Brno from 1929 to 1939.Read More →

Preben Fabricius Danish furniture designer and interior designer

In 1952, he worked as a cabinetmaker for Finn Juhl, designing chairs for the United Nations headquarters in New York. He was a collaborator with Jørgen Kasthol from 1962 to 1970. He taught furniture design at Skolen for Boligindretning since 1967. In 1968, he opened his own officRead More →

Nanny Ditzel and husband

Nanna Ditzel, a leading Danish 20th-century designer, had also worked in furniture, textiles and jewellery design for many decades and has been one of the few women designers in the country to achieve celebrity status.Read More →

Erik Magnussen featured image

Danish silversmith of Art Deco and Cubist works

Erik Magnussen was a silversmith and designer from Denmark. He lived in the United States from 1925 to 1939, first as artistic director of the Gorham Manufacturing Company in New York City and subsequently with his workshop in Chicago and Los Angeles.Read More →

Flexible Shelf System

What happens when Benjamin Hubert’s LAYER partners with upcycled textile maker Really? An extremely clever, flexible shelving system for textile manufacturer Kvadrat called SHIFT. The wall system quickly goes from a flat acoustic panel to a display shelf in seconds making it perfect for retail spaces, exhibitions, or openings when display areas need to be changed up.Read More →

Relaunch of Magnus Olesen Series

The 8000 series chair, designed by Magnus Olsen and first introduced in 1981, is a design classic that, in many people’s opinion, played a crucial role in defining furniture design in the 1980s.Read More →

Grethe Meyer ceramics featured image

She worked on the editorial staff of The Building Manual from 1944 to 1955. She was a crucial figure in Borge Mogensen’s research on the standardisation of consumer product sizes, and she collaborated with him frequently. They created the Boligens Byggeskabe (BB) and resund cabinet-storage systems in 1957.Read More →

Set of Ten Holmgaard Glassby Per Lütken

Lütken was the principal designer at Kastrup & Holmegard Glasverk from 1942 to 1945, where he adopted his predecessor Jacob Bang’s Modern shapes. In the 1950s, he implemented considerable improvements in manufacturing and aesthetic at Holmegard, inspired by the Triennali di Milano. His pieces featured fluid forms in light-coloured glass, some of which had satin-finish etching. He used heated metal to sculpt created glass.Read More →

Jens Quistgaard teapot featured image

After the second world war, Jens Harald Quistgaard was apprenticed in the Georg Jensen Solvsmedie in Copenhagen. He has experimented with various media such as wood, metal, glass, steel and ceramics. Ted Nierenberg, the founder of Dansk International, noticed him because of his distinctively Danish craft aesthetic.Read More →

Dansk International - Design Firm

Dansk quickly gained a reputation for well-designed dinnerware that embodied the sophisticated postwar Scandinavian aesthetic of combining artisan traditions with industrial production. Read More →

Flemming Lassen was born on February 23, 1902, in Copenhagen, to a family of artists. His mother, Ingeborg Winding, was a painter, and his father, Hans Vilhelm Lassen, was a decorative painter. Before completing his study at the Technical School, he worked as a mason. Read More →

BM0488S Table Bench by Carl Hansen

Carl Hansen & Son has unveiled the BM0488S Table Bench – a shorter version of Børge Mogensen’s famous bench with the characteristic woven seat, understated details and precise craftsmanship.Read More →

Bottle Opener - Arne Petersen

At the Copenhagen firm C.C. Herman, Petersen learnt silver and goldsmithing methods. He joined the Georg Jensen Solvsmedie in 1948 and worked in the hollow-ware department until 1976. His 1975 Bottle Opener, made of stainless steel soldered with brass, received a lot of attention.
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