danish modern

Examples of Danish Modern Furniture

Danish Modern From the 1950s onwards, this term, along with its Scandinavian and Swedish counterparts, was widely used to describe those aspects of Danish design that acknowledged some of the characteristics of Modernism but were distinguished by the use of more traditional materials, natural finishes, organic shapes, sculptural form, and a respect for craftsmanship.Read More →

Tove and Edvard Kindt-Larsen Cabinet with Original Green Interior

Danish architect and furniture designer Edvard Kindt-Larsen (1901–1982) collaborated frequently with his wife Tove Kindt-Larsen (1906–1994). The couple worked in the fields of architecture, furniture design, silverware design, and textiles from the 1930s to the 1960s, ranking among Denmark’s leading designers.Read More →

Peder Moos featured image

The son of a farmer, he attended Askov Højskole, a folk High School, before training as a cabinetmaker in Jutland and later in Copenhagen. From 1926 to 1929, he worked in Paris, Geneva and Lausanne. In 1935, he moved into Bredgade in Copenhagen where he started his own workshop which he maintained for 20 years. He attended evening classes at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts where he studied under Einar Utzon-Franck and Kaare Klint.Read More →

Mogens Koch featured image

In 1934, he set up his own design office. He designed the 1932 Safari chair, still in production today by Interna in Frederikssund (Denmark). He designed a range of objects, including furniture for Rasmussens Snedkerier, Ivan Schlechter, Cado, Danish CWS, and Interna; carpets; fittings; silver; and fabrics for use in the restoration of Danish churches. He published the book Modern Danish Arts — Craftsmanship (1948).Read More →

Pair of Six Jens Risom Side/Dining Room Chairs Model 666 for Walter Knoll 1950s

He studied at Krebs’ School to 1928, St. Anne Vester School to 1932, and Niels Brock’s Business School, University of Copenhagen, to 1934. Between 1935—38, he studied furniture and interior design at Kunstandvaerkerskolen, Copenhagen.Read More →

Bowls by Henning Koppel

Koppel had his debut as a sculptor at the Artists’ Authumn Exhibition in 1935 with an expressive portrait bust. He was also represented with drawings on several exhibitions. His best works as a sculptor are the busts of Valdemar and Jytte Koppel (1938 and 1942, both in black granite) and Tora Nordstrom Bonnier and Karl-Adam Bonnier (both 1944).Read More →

Chairs designed by Peter Hvidt

Peter Hvidt (1919-1986) was a Danish architect and Cabinet maker.Read More →

Klint Kaare featured image

Kaare Klint – Danish furniture designer. The Danes were greatly influenced by Germany’s Bauhaus movement in the early part of the twentieth century. Read More →

Andreas Hansen featured image

He studied at the Kunsthåndvaerkerskolen, Copenhagen, to 1962 and Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademiets Møbelskole, Copenhagen to 1963.Read More →

Jörgen Kastholm featured image

Kastholm was apprenticed as a boy to a blacksmith and worked at that trade for five years in the United States before returning to Copenhagen to study design. Between 1954 – 1958 he studied at the Bygingsteknisk Skole, Frederick, under Arne Jacobsen. In 1959 the Grafisk Høskole. After graduation, he practised architecture and furniture design in Beirut.Read More →

Cylinda Line Teapot by Arne Jacobsen

In 1927, Jacobsen established his practice in Hellerup. He was Denmark’s first exponent of Functionalism, influenced by Modern architecture of the 1930s, such as Le Corbusier, Gunnar Asplund, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. His first significant assignment was the Bellavista housing complex in Copenhagen, which he completed between 1930 and 1934.Read More →

Bojensen Monkey

Kay Bojesen (1886-1958) was a Danish silversmith and designer. Most notably, his monkey, displayed at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from the 1950s to the 1960s, is widely accepted as a design classic.Read More →

Preben Fabricius Danish furniture designer and interior designer

In 1952, he worked as a cabinetmaker for Finn Juhl, designing chairs for the United Nations headquarters in New York. He was a collaborator with Jørgen Kasthol from 1962 to 1970. He taught furniture design at Skolen for Boligindretning since 1967. In 1968, he opened his own officRead More →

Set of Ten Holmgaard Glassby Per Lütken

Lütken was the principal designer at Kastrup & Holmegard Glasverk from 1942 to 1945, where he adopted his predecessor Jacob Bang’s Modern shapes. In the 1950s, he implemented considerable improvements in manufacturing and aesthetic at Holmegard, inspired by the Triennali di Milano. His pieces featured fluid forms in light-coloured glass, some of which had satin-finish etching. He used heated metal to sculpt created glass.Read More →

Dansk International - Design Firm

Dansk quickly gained a reputation for well-designed dinnerware that embodied the sophisticated postwar Scandinavian aesthetic of combining artisan traditions with industrial production. Read More →

Flemming Lassen was born on February 23, 1902, in Copenhagen, to a family of artists. His mother, Ingeborg Winding, was a painter, and his father, Hans Vilhelm Lassen, was a decorative painter. Before completing his study at the Technical School, he worked as a mason. Read More →

BM0488S Table Bench by Carl Hansen

Carl Hansen & Son has unveiled the BM0488S Table Bench – a shorter version of Børge Mogensen’s famous bench with the characteristic woven seat, understated details and precise craftsmanship.Read More →

Hans and Lise Isbrand featured image

Lise and Hans Isbrand have shown up at the SE shows multiple times with intriguing and experimental prototypes. Their work, on the other hand, tends to be more focused on ordinary life. As a result, they are responsible for various fascinating workplace furniture, inventive culinary utensils, and other items.Read More →

SKOVBY #840 STOOL featured image

A stackable and sustainable stool produced entirely from waste pieces is created by combining pieces cut from round and elliptical shaped tables.Read More →

Hans Wegner featured image

Organic Functionality, a modernist school emphasising Functionality, is a term used to define his style. With contributions by Poul Henningsen, Alvar Aalto, and Arne Jacobsen, this school of thought originated predominantly in Scandinavian countries.Read More →