The following are 5 popular topics that are published on Google and Arts and Culture. It is one of my favourite parts of the Google universe.

1. Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci – Google Arts & Culture

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, known as Leonardo da Vinci, was an Italian polymath of the Renaissance whose areas of interest included invention, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, paleontology, and cartography.

2. Pop art

Pop art – Google Arts & Culture

International movement in painting, sculpture and printmaking. The term originated in the mid-1950s at the ICA, London, in the discussions held by the Independent Group concerning the artefacts of popular culture. This small group included the artists Richard Hamilton and Eduardo Paolozzi as well as architects and critics.

3. Impressionism

4. Cubism

Cubism - Google Arts & Culture

Term derived from a reference made to 'geometric schemas and cubes' by the critic Louis Vauxcelles in describing paintings exhibited in Paris by Georges Braque in November 1908; it is more generally applied not only to work of this period by Braque and Pablo Picasso but also to a range of art produced in France during the later 1900s, the 1910s and the early 1920s and to variants developed in other countries.

5. Art Nouveau

Art Nouveau - Google Arts & Culture

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates.

Cubism: Colour Library - Encyclopedia of Design

Cubism was one of the most influential movement in Western art this century. Beginning with the revolutionary experiments of Picasso and Braque in Paris between 1906 and 1908, cubism gathered momentum and soon spread to the rest of Europe and America.

French fabrics in the art deco style - Encyclopedia of Design

Ruhlmann used the same basic motif-a stylized Cedar of Lebanon tree set within an irregular circle-on this textile and related wallpaper (MMA 2005.334), though on the textile each motif is offset by an added circle of dots. The pattern was produced in alternate colorways.

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