4 Decorating Mistakes You May Not Even Realise You’re Making 🤭

A yellow two door Japanese micro kitchen with black interior shelving

Decorating — that is, making your home the best it can be in terms of aesthetic. Decorating is a skill, not a science, and it can be challenging to master. Even the most well-intentioned designers make mistakes, and sometimes they’re blunders you’re not even aware of. Ask yourself if you’re making one of these five blunders in a space in your house that just isn’t coming together.

1. Thinking Everything has to Match

The theory went that if you stick to a single colour scheme, you’ll be able to decorate honestly. This assumption that everything must match, from the drapes to the carpet to the bedspread to the throw cushions, could be a throwback to the 1950s and 1960s. But having everything in a room be the same colour (or even the same colour family or material) can appear a little too controlled, a little too Stepford Wife, to modern eyes. Focus on what “goes” rather than what “matches” – while certain things don’t look good together, the best interiors mix things that are a little bit surprising.

2. Focusing Only on Color and Not on Texture

The texture is one of the things that brings room to life, yet it’s an aspect of design that’s often overlooked. A thick blanket, a nubby rug, or an ornate piece of vintage furniture can frequently make a space that feels a little bland pop. Do you want to learn more? Here are seven fantastic ways to incorporate texture into your home.

3. Filling a Room With Way Too Much Stuff

The temptation when decorating, especially when working with a smaller space, is to cram as much as possible into the available space. I’m here to warn you against this method. All of the lovely things you’ve crammed into your space need space to breathe and allowing a bit more room than you think you’ll need can make all of your favourite things shine. When you add in all the items of life — the shoes, books, and stacks of mail that always accumulate — it will also help your home appear less congested.

4. Not Looking at the Big Picture

It can feel like putting together a room is a series of minor, excruciating decisions. I’m aware that I’m prone to get caught up in the details, such as locating the perfect mirror or light in the exact finish that I’m confident is the appropriate one. Taking a step back, looking at the broad picture, and asking yourself, “What does this room need?” can assist. Perhaps your area has a lot of weighty items that need to be balanced out with something light. Maybe some texture or contrast would help. Taking a step back and looking at the big picture can be precisely what you need to find the one ingredient that will tie everything together. (Here’s a tip: take a picture of your space with your phone and then look at it.) You’d be shocked what you see in a photo that your eyes would overlook if you were looking at it in person.)

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