Design ♡

Isamu Noguchi featured image
Design

Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) American sculptor and designer.

Kurt Versen Table Lamp

Kurt Versen (1901 – 1997) Swedish lighting designer

Charles Plumet furniture

Functionalism a design and architectural principle

Barbini Glassworks

Barbini Glasswork Italian Glass Manufacturers

Rya Carpet Finnish Weaving Technique

Rya – Finnish Weaving Process

Henri Rapin Art Nouveau Chairs

Henri Rapin (1873 – 1939) French artist and decorator

Ulrich Franzen home Rye New York

Ulrich Franzen (1921 – 2012) German-born American architect and designer


DESIGNERS


Decorative & Applied Arts

Isamu Noguchi featured image

Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) American sculptor and designer.

Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988), was an American sculptor and designer. He was born in Los Angeles and professionally active in New York. He was influential and well-received in the twentieth century. He produced sculptures, gardens, furniture and lighting designs, ceramics, architecture, and set designs throughout his lifetime of creative experimentation. His work, both subtle and bold, traditional and modern, set a new standard for reintegrating the arts.

Bowls by Henning Koppel

Henning Koppel (1918 – 1981) Danish Designer

Koppel had his debut as a sculptor at the Artists’ Authumn Exhibition in 1935 with an expressive portrait bust. He was also represented with drawings on several exhibitions. His best works as a sculptor are the busts of Valdemar and Jytte Koppel (1938 and 1942, both in black granite) and Tora Nordstrom Bonnier and Karl-Adam Bonnier (both 1944).


TYPE OF DESIGN


Industrial Design

Cadillac Eldorado 1959 Pink

1959 Cadillac Eldorado – Temple Rather than Automobile

The 1959 Cadillac is more of a temple than an automobile, a Gothic memorial to America’s glory years. It was overly long, low, and overstyled, and it’s the 50s’ final flourish. The 59’s outlandish space-age appearance, weird fins, and lavish 390 cubic inch V8 are fascinating, but the most striking aspect of the car is its blatant arrogance.

Architecture

Functionalism a design and architectural principle

With his motto ‘form follows function,’ American architect Louis Sullivan is considered the founder of 20th-century Functionalism. Functionalism became a label for an extremely wide variety of avant-garde architecture and design in the first half of the 20th century, including Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s classical Rationalism, Erich Mendelsohn’s Expressionism, Giuseppe Terragni’s unadorned, heroic structures, Frank Lloyd Wright’s organic architecture, and Le Corbusier’s Cubist solids.


150 YEARS OF DESIGN


Curated Content

Raymond Loewy (1893 – 1986) – an American Designer

He arrived in the United States in 1929, just in time for the great depression. As it happened the beginning of the depression was a fortuitous time for a talented designer with new ideas to arrive in the United States. The old design aesthetic was disappearing with the collapsing economy. Manufacturers wanted to stimulate demand for their products by offering customers new designs, and Loewy had an abundance of them with the ego to match. His mother had always told him, “It is better to be envied than pitied.”

Royal Academy of Art

Royal Academy of the Arts

Monogram featured image

What is a Monogram?

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Design Classics

Cadillac Eldorado 1959 Pink

1959 Cadillac Eldorado – Temple Rather than Automobile

The 1959 Cadillac is more of a temple than an automobile, a Gothic memorial to America’s glory years. It was overly long, low, and overstyled, and it’s the 50s’ final flourish. The 59’s outlandish space-age appearance, weird fins, and lavish 390 cubic inch V8 are fascinating, but the most striking aspect of the car is its blatant arrogance.

All Posts

The Yorkshire Coast featured image

She was a juror of the 1922 Carnegie International competition, Pittsburgh. She designed both the shapes and the decorations for the 1933—34 Circus range of tableware produced by Arthur J. Wilkinson, Burslem, under Clarice Cliff’s supervision.Read More →

Isamu Noguchi featured image

Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988), was an American sculptor and designer. He was born in Los Angeles and professionally active in New York. He was influential and well-received in the twentieth century. He produced sculptures, gardens, furniture and lighting designs, ceramics, architecture, and set designs throughout his lifetime of creative experimentation. His work, both subtle and bold, traditional and modern, set a new standard for reintegrating the arts.Read More →

Roger Fry Garment featured image

Roger Fry was a British painter, writer, art critic, designer, and lecturer. He was born in London. Between 1885 – 1890, he studied natural sciences, Cambridge University, and Académie Julian, Paris, 1892. Read More →

Bowls by Henning Koppel

Koppel had his debut as a sculptor at the Artists’ Authumn Exhibition in 1935 with an expressive portrait bust. He was also represented with drawings on several exhibitions. His best works as a sculptor are the busts of Valdemar and Jytte Koppel (1938 and 1942, both in black granite) and Tora Nordstrom Bonnier and Karl-Adam Bonnier (both 1944).Read More →

Ferdinand kramer products

Kramer’s father was the owner of the most well-known of Frankfurt hat shops. In 1916, immediately after school, Kramer was drawn into military service and remained a soldier through the end of the First World War. The following year he trained at the Bauhaus for a few months before quitting, disillusioned with the technical level of the training, then began a three-year architectural study in Munich with Theodor Fischer.Read More →

Kurt Versen Table Lamp

In the 1940s and 1950s, executed many assignments from architects for flexible lighting appropriate to Modern interiors.Read More →

He opened his workshop in New York in 1952 and received his first commission, from the architecture firm Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, for draperies for 1952 Lever House, New York. At this time, he began machine-weaving fabrics that had the appearance of handweaving; they were subsequently much imitated. Read More →

Charles Plumet furniture

With his motto ‘form follows function,’ American architect Louis Sullivan is considered the founder of 20th-century Functionalism. Functionalism became a label for an extremely wide variety of avant-garde architecture and design in the first half of the 20th century, including Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s classical Rationalism, Erich Mendelsohn’s Expressionism, Giuseppe Terragni’s unadorned, heroic structures, Frank Lloyd Wright’s organic architecture, and Le Corbusier’s Cubist solids. Read More →

Barbini Glassworks

Alfredo Barbini, a descendant of glassmakers from the early 15th century, studied at Abate Zanetti (design school at Murano glass museum) from age ten; in 1930, began studying at Cristalleria, Murano, becoming a maestro; became primo maestro at Martinuzzi and Zecchin; worked with Cenedese in the late 1940sRead More →

Rya Carpet Finnish Weaving Technique

Eva Brummer set up a studio in Helsinki in 1929 to revive the technique, which involves cutting the pile unevenly in order to create a thick relief effect. As rugs, the weavings became popular in the 1950s and were closely identified with the exuberant Scandinavian Modern style.Read More →

Henri Rapin Art Nouveau Chairs

Rapin worked as a painter, illustrator, furniture designer, and decorator. From 1903, his furniture was generally simple. From 1910, he began to produce more elaborate designs using exotic materials and carved wood panels by Eve Le Bourgeois and Charles Hairon. These designs were in response to the challenge from the designers of the Münchner Vereeingite Werkstätten für Kunst in Handwerk exhibiting at the Salon of the same year.Read More →

Ulrich Franzen home Rye New York

Ulrich Franzen, the German-born American architect, was a leading figure in the first post-war generation of American architects; including Paul Rudolph, Harry Cobb, John Maclane Johansen, and Philip Johnson. Read More →

Ceramics - terracotta pots stacked

Ceramics are objects made of moistened clay, shaped and then baked. All ceramics are Earthenware, terracotta, brick, tile, faience, majolica, stoneware, and porcelain. Ceramicware is decorated with clay inlays, relief patterns on the surface, or incised, stamped or embossed designs. Read More →

Claude Montana featured image

Montana’s career in fashion began almost accidentally; he moved to London in the early 1970s “to escape studying,” having no plans and no work visa. Raising money by selling rhinestone-studded papier mache jewellery, he met a Vogue editor by happenstance and had his work featured in the magazine. Read More →

Geoffrey Beene in black and white

Geoffrey Beene (1927 – 2004) was an American fashion designer; born Haynesville, Louisiana. He was a premed student at Tulane University when he found himself sketching gowns when he became bored during his lectures. Along with Bill Blass, he was regarded as the Godfather of American sportswear. Read More →

Clyne Farquharson featured image

In the 1930s, Farquharson was a major contributor to the design of British glassware. His documented career in glass began in 1935 with Arches, an engraved design on glass produced by John Walsh Walsh, where he produced other cut-crystal glassware as its head designer 1935—51. Read More →

Marcel Boucher featured image

In 1925 Marcel Boucher arrived in New York from France and went to work for Cartier as a jeweller. Eventually, he leaves there and makes shoe buckles, possibly for Trifari. At this time, jewellery is all flat, without high modulation. Marcel started his firm in the Thirties, and his first line is an extraordinary group of bird pins made with coloured stones and bright enamels. Nothing like this has ever been done before.Read More →

XII Triennale 1960 - Entrance Hall

It is referred to as the world’s most important cultural exhibit. The 1960 Triennale was the 12th to be held since 1930, and was created around the themes, “Home and School.” It was held during the middle to the “Cold War, and nations from both sides of the ‘Iron Curtain’ were exhibiting by invitation.Read More →

Hannah Hoch's 1925 "Equillibre," or Balance," was originally titled "America Balancing Europe."

As a designer, I am passionate about the history of art and their influence on ‘visual design.’  In art history, Dada is the artistic movement that preceded Surrealism, it began in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1916 by a group of mostly painters and painters.  Dada artworks challenged the preconceived notions of what art meant.  Many Dadaists felt that the way to salvation was through political anarchy, the natural emotions, the intuitive and the irrational.Read More →

Cadillac Eldorado 1959 Pink

The 1959 Cadillac is more of a temple than an automobile, a Gothic memorial to America’s glory years. It was overly long, low, and overstyled, and it’s the 50s’ final flourish. The 59’s outlandish space-age appearance, weird fins, and lavish 390 cubic inch V8 are fascinating, but the most striking aspect of the car is its blatant arrogance.Read More →