ceramics

Ceramics or (French) céramique,  A nineteenth-century term, derived from Greek, for pottery and the art of making pottery. In specialist usage, when porcelain is distinguished from pottery, the term ‘ceramics’ is deemed to encompass both arts.

Gien Pottery featured image

Gien Pottery. This company is often known simply as Gien Pottery, after its location in thatRead More →

Vase manufactured by the Eureka Pottery 1883 to 1887

The Eureka Pottery was the last commercial pottery constructed during the historic three decades during which potteries were established in Trenton. The company made the most beautiful majolica in Trenton. It was established in 1883 by Leon Weil, who Noah and Charles Boch succeeded. It was closed in 1887 due to fire, the constant enemy of potteries.Read More →

Michael Cardew featured image

He learned to throw pottery from William Fishley Holland at the Braunton Pottery, North Devon, 1921—22. In 1923, he met Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada at St. Ives.Read More →

Rut Bryk featured image

In 1942, she worked for the pottery Arabia, Helsinki; from 1959, she was a freelance ceramics designer with Rosenthal, Selb. From the 1960s, she worked for Vassa Cotton Company.Read More →

Minton Ceramics Manufacturer

Thomas Minton bought a pottery in Stoke-on-Trent in 1793 and, in 1796, began production of inexpensive blue transfer-printed earthenware. His son Herbert Minton became director in 1836, expanded the range of wares, and hired artists. Read More →

The Yorkshire Coast featured image

She was a juror of the 1922 Carnegie International competition, Pittsburgh. She designed both the shapes and the decorations for the 1933—34 Circus range of tableware produced by Arthur J. Wilkinson, Burslem, under Clarice Cliff’s supervision.Read More →

Ruskin Pottery featured image

While it was prone to cynicism in the 20th century – for example, it was often pointed out that Morris’ handmade goods were too costly for anyone other than the wealthy he claimed to despise. However, through a fertile and now highly valued time of applied art, the Arts & Crafts wove a distinctive pattern.Read More →

Christian Joachim featured image

Christian Joachim was a Danish Ceramicist (1870-1943). Between 1889 he studied at the Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, Copenhagen.

Between 1897 and 1900, Joachim made ceramics with George Jensen in a workshop outside Copenhagen. Between 1901 to 1933 worked for the Royal Copenhagen Porcelain Manufactory, where Arno Malinowski sometimes decorated his restrained neoclassical forms. Read More →

Arzberg Porcelain Firm

Arzberg is regarded as one of the most prestigious porcelain design houses in the world. The definition of good design. Arzberg combines aesthetics, functionality, and durability.Read More →

Lee Yun Hee is a very popular Korean ceramic artist. Her ceramic works consists of layers of variously sized unitsRead More →

New Wave Clay featured image

Throughout the twentieth century, ceramics was broadly divided into two sectors. Studio pottery, which was a reaction against the mass-made wares of the industrial revolution, and fine art by contemporary artists, who just happened to use clay in their practice but rejected many of its traditional codes of practice.Read More →

Shoji Hamada featured image

Shoji Hamada, along with Bernard Leach, was one of the key figures in the development of studio pottery in the 20th century. His influence both in England and the US as well as in his native Japan cannot be underestimated. Read More →

Kari Christensen Norwegian Designer

Christensen worked at Royal Copenhagen Porcelain factory; from 1966, worked in own workshop, Oslo; from c1966, taught, Statens Handverks -og Kunstindustriskale, Oslo, and was a professor there from c1986.Read More →

Émile Diffloth featured image

In 1899, he became artistic director of Kéramis, Belgian pottery owned by Boch Freres in La Louviere. In c1910, he moved to University City, Missouri, to work for Taxile Doat as a ceramics teacher at the School of Ceramic Art. He went back to France. He belonged to the Société des Artistes Françaises.Read More →

Stig Lindberg featured image

Stig Lindberg (1916 – 1982) was a Swedish ceramic, glass, textile, industrial designer, and painter and illustrator. During his long career with the Gustavsberg pottery factory, Lindberg produced whimsical studio ceramics and graceful tableware lines, making him one of Sweden’s most important postwar designers. Read More →

Taxile Doat featured image

Taxile Maxmilien Doat (1851 – 1938) was a French ceramicist. He was born in Albi, and he was active in University City, Missouri.Read More →

Lucien Levy-Dhurmer Vase

Levy-Dhurmer may have been responsible for the rediscovery of the metallic lustre glaze technique used in Middle Eastern ceramics from the 9th century and in Hispano-Moresque pottery of the 15th century. However, the sheen on pieces by Massier and Levy-Dhunner has not lasted. He used primarily light-coloured earthenware with gold highlights and sombre-glazed stoneware. Read More →

Lino Sabitinni featured image

Sabbatini worked as a silversmith from a very early age.  He learned metalworking techniques and became interested in shapes derived from natural materials.  The Boule teapot and example of his early work was designed for T. Wolff in Germany.Read More →

Anders Liljefors was a Swedish ceramicist. He initially concerned himself with household ware, discovered a new method of casting ceramics in a sand mould, and worked feverishly to extract new and unexpected effects from this material during the later years of his life.Read More →

Boehm Glassware featured image

Boehm joined Rosenthal in 1966. His limited-edition Reticelli range illustrated his interest in Italian glass by incorporating cotton twist threads in the molten glass-like 17th-century Venetian vessels. Read More →