Danish Design

Mogens Koch featured image

In 1934, he set up his own design office. He designed the 1932 Safari chair, still in production today by Interna in Frederikssund (Denmark). He designed a range of objects, including furniture for Rasmussens Snedkerier, Ivan Schlechter, Cado, Danish CWS, and Interna; carpets; fittings; silver; and fabrics for use in the restoration of Danish churches. He published the book Modern Danish Arts ÔÇö Craftsmanship (1948).Read More →

Set of three silver brooches by Arno Malinowski

His jewellery designs of a kneeling deer, a dolphin in the rushes, and butterflies on a flower, which he created in 1937, were produced for many years. In 1940, he created the ‘Kingmark’ to commemorate King Christian’s seventieth birthday. It was mass-produced and worn by Danes to demonstrate their allegiance to Denmark and opposition to the German occupation.┬áRead More →

Jo╠łrgen Kastholm featured image

Kastholm was apprenticed as a boy to a blacksmith and worked at that trade for five years in the United States before returning to Copenhagen to study design. Between 1954 – 1958 he studied at the Bygingsteknisk Skole, Frederick, under Arne Jacobsen. In 1959 the Grafisk H├Şskole. After graduation, he practised architecture and furniture design in Beirut.Read More →

Cylinda Line Teapot by Arne Jacobsen

In 1927, Jacobsen established his practice in Hellerup. He was Denmark’s first exponent of Functionalism, influenced by Modern architecture of the 1930s, such as Le Corbusier, Gunnar Asplund, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. His first significant assignment was the Bellavista housing complex in Copenhagen, which he completed between 1930 and 1934.Read More →

Preben Fabricius Danish furniture designer and interior designer

In 1952, he worked as a cabinetmaker for Finn Juhl, designing chairs for the United Nations headquarters in New York. He was a collaborator with J├Şrgen Kasthol from 1962 to 1970. He taught furniture design at Skolen for Boligindretning since 1967. In 1968, he opened his own officRead More →

Bowls by Henning Koppel

Koppel had his debut as a sculptor at the Artists’ Authumn Exhibition in 1935 with an expressive portrait bust. He was also represented with drawings on several exhibitions. His best works as a sculptor are the busts of Valdemar and Jytte Koppel (1938 and 1942, both in black granite) and Tora Nordstrom Bonnier and Karl-Adam Bonnier (both 1944).Read More →

Christian Joachim featured image

Christian Joachim was a Danish Ceramicist (1870-1943). Between 1889 he studied at the Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, Copenhagen.

Between 1897 and 1900, Joachim made ceramics with George Jensen in a workshop outside Copenhagen. Between 1901 to 1933 worked for the Royal Copenhagen Porcelain Manufactory, where Arno Malinowski sometimes decorated his restrained neoclassical forms. Read More →

Flexible Shelf System

What happens when Benjamin HubertÔÇÖs LAYER partners with upcycled textile maker Really? An extremely clever, flexible shelving system for textile manufacturer Kvadrat called SHIFT. The wall system quickly goes from a flat acoustic panel to a display shelf in seconds making it perfect for retail spaces, exhibitions, or openings when display areas need to be changed up.Read More →

Grethe Meyer ceramics featured image

She worked on the editorial staff of The Building Manual from 1944 to 1955. She was a crucial figure in Borge Mogensen’s research on the standardisation of consumer product sizes, and she collaborated with him frequently. They created the Boligens Byggeskabe (BB) and resund cabinet-storage systems in 1957.Read More →

Set of Ten Holmgaard Glassby Per Lu╠łtken

L├╝tken was the principal designer at Kastrup & Holmegard Glasverk from 1942 to 1945, where he adopted his predecessor Jacob Bang’s Modern shapes. In the 1950s, he implemented considerable improvements in manufacturing and aesthetic at Holmegard, inspired by the Triennali di Milano. His pieces featured fluid forms in light-coloured glass, some of which had satin-finish etching. He used heated metal to sculpt created glass.Read More →

Examples of Danish Modern Furniture

Danish Modern From the 1950s onwards, this term, along with its Scandinavian and Swedish counterparts, was widely used to describe those aspects of Danish design that acknowledged some of the characteristics of Modernism but were distinguished by the use of more traditional materials, natural finishes, organic shapes, sculptural form, and a respect for craftsmanship.Read More →

Jens Quistgaard teapot featured image

After the second world war, Jens Harald Quistgaard was apprenticed in the Georg Jensen Solvsmedie in Copenhagen. He has experimented with various media such as wood, metal, glass, steel and ceramics. Ted Nierenberg, the founder of Dansk International, noticed him because of his distinctively Danish craft aesthetic.Read More →