design movement

Sparton Model 557 'Sled' Table Radio, ca. 1936 Brooklyn Museum

Moderne was a decorative style that was mostly about how things looked on the outside. Moderne architecture was most noticeable in public buildings like skyscrapers and movie theatres. Postmodernism later brought back a lot of the styles that were part of the moderne movement.Read More →

Roger Fry postimpressionist painter

Post-Impressionism (sometimes called Postimpressionism) was a significant French art trend that evolved between 1886 and 1905. Paul Cรฉzanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, and Georges Seurat led the movement. Post-Impressionism was a reaction to Impressionism’s naturalistic light and colour. Post-Impressionism covers the work of Les Nabis, Neo-Impressionism, Symbolism, Cloisonnism, the Pont-Aven School, and Synthetism.Read More →

God Save the Queen Cover

The realities of dissatisfied working-class urban teenagers with little hope of a job, housing, or a meaningful future shaped Punk in the mid-1970s. Read More →

Pop Art featured image

Pop Art was never a cohesive movement. Instead, it inched its way up the international art scene, starting in the mid-1950s, as the invention of artists throughout Europe and the United States, artists who were often working independently and in isolation from each other.Read More →

Futurism featured image

Futurism was an art movement consisting of painting, sculpture, and literature that flourished from 1909.ย  It was established by Italian, poet, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and inspired by Cubism.ย  Marinetti coined the term Futurism for the art movement that he founded.ย  ย He intended it as a celebration of modernity and a rejection of romance and sentiment, it was dedicated to modernity and speed, to the violent, the urban and the mechanical.Read More →

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: Esplanade Apartments and Lake Shore Drive Apartments

Alfred H. Barr Jr. coined the term in 1931 in conjunction with Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock’s 1932 “Modern Architecture: International Exhibition” (along with the accompanying book International Style: Architecture Since 1922) at the New York Museum of Modern Art, where Barr was director.Read More →

Neue Sachlichkeit - Design Term

Neue Sachlichkeit was a term coined in 1923 by Gustav Hartlaub, director of the Kunsthalle, Mannheim, as the title of an exhibition he organised to demonstrate the progress of post-war painting in Germany.Read More →

In the 1930s, when modern Swedish design was becoming more well-known in Europe and the United States, this term became popular. However, it peaked in the 1950s. It combined many of Modernism’s characteristics with natural materials like wood and Scandinavian respect for craftsmanship.Read More →