French design (Page 5)

Hermine the 'Otter' created in bronze

Jan and Joel Martel (1896 – 1966) were twin brothers and French sculptors. They were born in Nantes and active in Paris. Cement, glass, steel, mirrors, ceramics, lacquers, and synthetics were all used in their projects.Read More →

French by Design featured image

The timeless appeal of French-country style, a gracious mingling of sophistication and comfort, spans generations. After years of mainly echoing the furniture, fabrics, and accessories associated with the Provence region, the French country is often far away from the primitive images of the early seventeenth century. Read More →

Louis Majorelle featured image

Majorelle took over the family cabinetmaking and ceramics business in Nancy in 1879. In the late 1880s, he began designing Modern furniture. Working in the Art Nouveau style, Majorelle was the most dynamic practitioner of the School of Nancy. By mechanising his factory, he produced significant quantities of highly decorated commercial furniture and more elaborate pieces using expensive materials such as mahogany, burr walnut, and ormolu. Read More →

Charles Plumet furniture

In the year 1861, Charles Plumet was born. As an architect, he built structures in the mediaeval and early French Renaissance styles. He worked on interiors and furniture designs in Art Nouveau styles with Tony Selmersheim (1871ā€“1971). Between 1896 and 1901, Charles Plumet joined l’Art dans Tout (Art in Everything), an association of architects, painters, and sculptors who consciously attempted to renew decorative art, adopting styles ranging from adapted mediaeval to Art Nouveau. Read More →

Armand Point featured image

Armand Point (1861-1932) was a Symbolist painter, engraver, and designer from France, one of the Salon de la Rose + Croix founding members.

Point’s first paintings were orientalist scenes of markets and musicians and scenes from his childhood in Algeria’s streets. In 1888, he moved to Paris to study under Auguste Herst and Fernand Cormon at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Read More →

Francis Jourdain featured image

Francis Jourdain (1876 – 1958), the son of architect Frantz Jourdain, was born on November 2, 1876. His father created the Salon d’Automne collection. He benefited from his parents’ friendships with prominent intellectuals (Ɖmile Zola, Alphonse Daudet) and artists of the time (the circle of Alexandre Charpentier). Read More →

May 1968 Posters featured image

In the turbulent days of May 1968 in Paris, a group of artists calling themselves the Atelier Populaire created posters that were vital in spreading the call to unite student and workers.Ā  The propaganda of the French revolt was fed by immediate pressures.Ā  The day by day events – the disruption of classes at Nanterre University led by Daniel Cohn-Bendit, the supporting student demonstrations in Paris, the police invasion of the Sorbonne and its occupation by students, the barricades, and the government’s reaction and referendum…Read More →

French Jewellery featured image

With more than 80 stunning photographs, Masterpieces of French Jewelry offers a fascinating look at the most remarkable pieces that found their way into prominent American collections. Like all art, this delightful array of jewelry mirrors the evolving culture of its time. Chapters in this book explore jewelry of the Victorian Era and the Art Nouveau period of the early twentieth century; Art Deco; 1940s retro; up through the 1960s and more contemporary styles.Read More →

Mauboussin Jewellery Company - Design Profile

Maubossin is a jewellery company in France. The original company was established in 1827 in Paris, on Rue Grenata, where it manufactured jewellery. Starting in 1903, M.B. Noury was the owner and nephew of Georges Maubossin, who had been the director of the company since 1877. Mauboussin succeeded Noury in 1923, changing the firm’s name to Maubossin. At the intersection of rue Saint-Augustin, rue de Choiseul, and rue Monsigny in Paris, at address 3 rue de Choseul, he bought two connecting houses.Read More →

Salon des Arts MeĢnagers poster featured image

This institution began as the ‘Salon des Appareils MĆ©nagers’ in the Champ de Mars in Paris in 1923 to provide information to the French on all aspects of domestic management, furnishing, and decoration. The Salon moved to the Grand Palais in 1926, when it was renamed the ‘Salon des Arts MĆ©nagers.’ This first exhibition, which was largely devoted to domestic appliances, drew over 100,000 visitors.Read More →

Blue bowl Francois-EĢmile Deecorchement 925-26

PĆ¢te de Verre (French, ā€œglass pasteā€) is a material produced by grinding glass into a fine powder, adding a binder to create a paste, and adding a fluxing medium to facilitate melting. The paste is brushed or tamped into a mould, dried, and fused by firing. After annealing, the object is removed from the mould and finished.Read More →