French Design (Page 7)

Design is an important part of France’s economy and culture, and it’s also a big part of the country’s social life.

The beauty of French design reflects the country’s rich cultural heritage and artistic traditions. From the grandeur of Versailles to the quaint charm of Provence, French design encompasses a wide range of styles and influences. Whether it’s the ornate carvings and gilded accents of Louis XIV furniture or the simple elegance of a classic bistro chair, French design is characterized by its attention to detail and commitment to quality craftsmanship.

Using natural materials like wood, stone, and linen adds to the timeless appeal of French design, while bold colours and patterns lend a touch of whimsy and playfulness. From haute fashion to interior design, French style has influenced countless designers worldwide, making it an enduring symbol of sophistication and refinement.

Tubular nickel-plated metal seats designed by Michel Dufet featured image

He attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris to study painting and architecture. In 1913, he founded the MAM (Mobilier Artistique Moderne) decorating workshop at 3 Avenue de l’Opéra in Paris, producing modern furniture, wallpaper, fabrics, and lighting.Read More →

Savonerie carpet made by designer Gabriel Englinger

He worked in the Galeries Lafayette department store’s La Maitrise design workshop from 1922 to 1928. At the same time, he worked for Cornille as a designer and furniture builder. Studio Abran created a 1928 boudoir and a 1929 work cabinet and smoking stand, among other ensembles. Read More →

Democratic Design of the Union des Artistes Modernes

The French Union of Modern Artists (Union des artistes modernes; UAM) was a movement made up of decorative artists andRead More →

Georges Lepape featured image

Lepape’s work blends orientalist elements with flowing lines, vibrant colours, and graphic stylizations reminiscent of Alphonse Mucha, Erté, Gustav Klimt, and Henri de Toulouse-Art Lautrec’s Nouveau movement. Read More →

Gérard Dalmon featured image

he opened Galerie Néotu in Paris, and then in 1990, he opened Galerie Néotu in New York.Read More →

Jean-Charles Moreaux featured image

His first pieces of furniture were shown at the Salon d’Automne in 1924. He prefered poetic living spaces and believed that people deserved better than Corbusier’s “living machines.” Read More →

Smiling surfboards by Jean Julien

In a new series of minimalist illustrated surfboards, French artist Jean Jullien brings his distinctive cartoonish characters.Read More →

Matali Crasset featured image

Matali Crasset – French Product Designer. Crasset’s childhood on a farm undoubtedly influenced her distinct design style. Read More…
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Joseph-André Motte featured image

Joseph-André Motte ranks as the most influential and innovative figures of post-war French design. Two careers Furniture & Interior Designer.Read More →

Alexis Pichot Woodland Series

Submerging himself at the depths of this forest of Fontainebleau, Pichot captures the divine, earthy qualities of the property. READ MORERead More →

Ernest Chaplet featured image

Ernest Chaplet (1835 – 1909) was a French ceramicist, an early studio potter’ who mastered slip decoration, rediscovered stoneware, and conducted copper-red studies. From 1882 to 1885, he was the director of Charles Haviland’s workshop to study decorative processes, where he collaborated with artists such as Paul Gauguin. He eventually moved to Choisy-le-Roi, where he focused on porcelain glaze studies.Read More →

French Decor books featured image.

The French decor is back in style, and it’s the ideal style for your home. This style of décor has something unique about it, and while it can seem to be carefree, it adheres to an ideology that finds beauty in flaws. If you want to emulate the magnificent French countryside style in your home, you will want to check out these Kindle Edition books.Read More →

French by Design featured image

The timeless appeal of French-country style, a gracious mingling of sophistication and comfort, spans generations. After years of mainly echoing the furniture, fabrics, and accessories associated with the Provence region, the French country is often far away from the primitive images of the early seventeenth century. Read More →

French Country Cottage book cover

A layered mix of tableware and flower arrangements set the stage for inspired entertaining.

Entertaining starts with setting a fabulous table. In Courtney Allison’s signature French Country Cottage style, she showcases a myriad of romantic table settings for every occasion.Read More →

Totem furniture design

Totem was a Lyons-based French design collective. Cabinetmakers Jacques Bonnet, Frédérich du Chayla, Vincent Lemarchand, and Claire Olives founded Totem in 1980. Their furnishings straddled the line between art and function.Read More →

Louis Majorelle featured image

Majorelle took over the family cabinetmaking and ceramics business in Nancy in 1879. In the late 1880s, he began designing Modern furniture. Working in the Art Nouveau style, Majorelle was the most dynamic practitioner of the School of Nancy. By mechanising his factory, he produced significant quantities of highly decorated commercial furniture and more elaborate pieces using expensive materials such as mahogany, burr walnut, and ormolu. Read More →

Charles Plumet furniture

In the year 1861, Charles Plumet was born. As an architect, he built structures in the mediaeval and early French Renaissance styles. He worked on interiors and furniture designs in Art Nouveau styles with Tony Selmersheim (1871–1971). Between 1896 and 1901, Charles Plumet joined l’Art dans Tout (Art in Everything), an association of architects, painters, and sculptors who consciously attempted to renew decorative art, adopting styles ranging from adapted mediaeval to Art Nouveau. Read More →

Armand Point featured image

Armand Point (1861-1932) was a Symbolist painter, engraver, and designer from France, one of the Salon de la Rose + Croix founding members.

Point’s first paintings were orientalist scenes of markets and musicians and scenes from his childhood in Algeria’s streets. In 1888, he moved to Paris to study under Auguste Herst and Fernand Cormon at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Read More →

French Jewellery featured image

With more than 80 stunning photographs, Masterpieces of French Jewelry offers a fascinating look at the most remarkable pieces that found their way into prominent American collections. Like all art, this delightful array of jewelry mirrors the evolving culture of its time. Chapters in this book explore jewelry of the Victorian Era and the Art Nouveau period of the early twentieth century; Art Deco; 1940s retro; up through the 1960s and more contemporary styles.Read More →

Mauboussin Jewellery Company - Design Profile

Maubossin is a jewellery company in France. The original company was established in 1827 in Paris, on Rue Grenata, where it manufactured jewellery. Starting in 1903, M.B. Noury was the owner and nephew of Georges Maubossin, who had been the director of the company since 1877. Mauboussin succeeded Noury in 1923, changing the firm’s name to Maubossin. At the intersection of rue Saint-Augustin, rue de Choiseul, and rue Monsigny in Paris, at address 3 rue de Choseul, he bought two connecting houses.Read More →