glass

a hard, brittle substance, typically transparent or translucent, made by fusing sand with soda and lime and cooling rapidly. It is used to make windows, drinking containers, and other articles.

Rene Lalique featured image

Artisan in glass and creator of family firm Cristal Lalique René Lalique was a FrenchRead More →

Burmese Glass featured image

Burmese glass (1885) was an almost opaque satin glass. Its shading was from salmon pink at the top to pale yellow below. It was attractive mostly when illuminated and was much used in fairy lamps and occasionally in chandeliers and candelabra.Read More →

Around 1975, Moje began cutting the rods into thin wafers or strips and fusing them in a kiln. The pieces would then be cut again and re-fused to create rhythmic patterns of vibrant colour. In 1976, Moje returned to Hamburg after living in Danzinger Strasse. Read More →

Vase-sculpture ‘The Apple’ Designed by Ingeborg Lundin for Orrefors

Ingeborg Lundin (1921 – 1991) was a Swedish Glassware Designer. Between 1941 – 1946 she studied at Konstaackskolan and Tekniska Skolan, Stockholm.Read More →

French designer. He worked primarily in ceramics, but also designed for glass and gold. His ceramics, in an Art Deco style, were manufactured in Limoges Read More →

Benny Motzfeldt (1909-95), vases for Randsfjord and Plus

Motzfeldt is best known for her glass creations. Her work is on show at the National Museum of Art, Architecture, and Design in Oslo, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Kunstindustrimuseum in Copenhagen, the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, and the Frauenau Glass Museum in Germany (donation Wolfgang Kermer). Read More →

Etsuko Nishi Japanese Glass Designer

Etsuko Nishi is a Japanese Glass Designer. She is a leading expert in pâte de verre, one of the oldest and most difficult glass-making forms. The desired shape is first made of clay, which is used as the basis for the mould. The glass powder is then mixed with a special type of paste, and the mixture is then placed in the mould and then fired.Read More →

Murano glassware was historically decorated with opulent rubies and gold and fanciful forms in vibrant colours. He hired freelance designers like Martinuzzi and Fulvio Bianconi regularly. Gio Ponti from 1927, Carlo Scarpa from 1932, Eugene Berman from 1951, Ken Scott from 1951, Franco Albini from 1954, and Massimo Vignelli from 1956 were the designers he commissioned.Read More →

Teruo Yamada Japanese Glassware

His work was shown at 1980 ‘Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition,’ Tokyo; 1981 and 1990 ‘Glass in Japan,’ Tokyo; 1985 ‘New Glass in Japan,’ Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe; 1987 ‘The Art of Contemporary Japanese Studio Glass,’ Heller Gallery, New York; 1991 (V) Triennale of the Japan Glass Art Crafts Association, Heller Gallery.Read More →

Yuri Masaki Japanese Glass Designer

Yuri Masaki is a Japanese glass designer she was president of the Masaki Glass and Art Studio. Her work was included in 1987 and 1990…Read More →

Vicke Lindstrand featured image

He worked at Kariskrona Porslinsfabrik from 1935 to 1936; at Upsala-Ekeby from 1936 to 1950 (as art director from 1943 to 1950) Kosta Boda glassworks from 1950 to 1973, where he was design director while also maintaining his studio in Arhus. Often, his free-form work was engraved.Read More →

Set of Ten Holmgaard Glassby Per Lütken

Lütken was the principal designer at Kastrup & Holmegard Glasverk from 1942 to 1945, where he adopted his predecessor Jacob Bang’s Modern shapes. In the 1950s, he implemented considerable improvements in manufacturing and aesthetic at Holmegard, inspired by the Triennali di Milano. His pieces featured fluid forms in light-coloured glass, some of which had satin-finish etching. He used heated metal to sculpt created glass.Read More →

Kosta Boda Glassware featured image

Kosta Boda, for much of its early life, this famous Swedish glassmaking company’s production centred on drinking glasses, chandeliers, and window panes. However, in the late nineteenth century, with the employment of designers such as Alf Wallander and Gunnar Wennenberg, a more concerted design policy emerged, resulting in more fashionable, Art Nouveau-inspired products.Read More →

Wine Decanter featured image

When you serve wine in a decanter or carafe rather than directly from the bottle, you can completely appreciate its full potential, but why? The wine can oxygenate and aerate, allowing the wine to breathe after being sealed in a bottle for so long. A wine decanter has a reputation for being a formal and refined means of serving wine. However, this isn’t always the case.Read More →

The most thrilling of all games is passionate love. Master Perfumer Jacques Cavallier Belletrud was inspired to create a romantic, naughty fragrance that becomes one with the skin by the incredible tension oscillating between sensuality and complicity. Read More →

Vegetable Dish 1955Designed by Masakichi Awashima

After studying design at the Japan Art School in Tokyo, Awashima worked for artisan Kozo Kagami, who had studied Western glass methods in Germany from 1935 to 1946. Read More →

Jean Sala featured image

He was primarily taught by his glassblower father and is now regarded as one of the most accomplished Art Deco glass artists. Read More →

Quezel Glassware

Martin Bach and Thomas Johnson, Tiffany’s former glass mixer and foreman, started Quezel Art Glass and Decorating in Brooklyn in 1901. Many pieces of lustrous and ‘favrile’ glassware were manufactured by Bach and Johnson.Read More →

Arttu Brummer glassware

Arttu Brummer was a Finnish interior and glassware designer. Brummer set up his own interior design office in 1913. Read More →

Ajeto Glassworks featured image

Ajeto Glassworks – Czech Republic. Borek Spek, a renowned Czech designer, and Petr Novotny, a talented young glassblower, formed this glass company in 1989 Read More →