Alexander Calder (1898 – 1976) American Designer & Artist

Derriere Le Miroir No. 141, Plates 1 & 2 1963 by Alexander Calder
Derriere Le Miroir No. 141, Plates 1 & 2 1963 by Alexander Calder

Alexander Calder (1898 – 1976) was an American sculptor, painter and designer. He was the son of sculptor Alexander Sterling Calder and was born in Philadelphia.

Education

1915–18, studied art at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey; 1923–25, painting at the Art Students’ League in New York and under Boardman Robinson; 1926–27, art at the Académie de la Grande Chaumiere in Paris.

Biography

He worked as an engineer in Rutherford, New Jersey, in 1919, and as a draftsperson and engineer in West Coast logging camps from 1919 to 23; from 1923 to 1930, he was active in New York, sketching for the National Police Gazette 1925—26; in 1926, he travelled to England and Paris, where he produced his 1927—28 miniature circus and worked on wood sculpture; was best known for his mobiles,’ hanging sculptures whose amorphic and bio His linear, wiry images were most likely influenced by Joan Miro and Paul Klee. He worked on stage designs, graphics, jewellery, and hand-made household objects in 1969 and designing porcelains for Sevres and aeroplane fuselage motifs for Braniff Airlines. He also worked on stage designs, graphics, jewellery, and hand-made household objects and painted exclusively black, red, yellow, and white in his fine art.

Exhibitions

His art was first presented in 1928 at the Weyhe Gallery in New York, and it has since been the focus of over 180 exhibitions. At the 1937 Paris ‘Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne,’ a quick-silver fountain was displayed alongside Picasso’s Guernica and a work by Joan Miro at the Spanish Pavillion. In 1989—90, an international travelling exhibition of his utilitarian products was mounted.

Alexander Calder on 1stDibs

Click on image for more information

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

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  • Duane Bryers (1911 – 2012) – Pinup artist – naughty but nice

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    One of my favourite pinup artists was Minnesota born Duane Bryers, creator of the famous Hilda, a pleasingly, popular and plump pinup girl. Bryers’ background was as interesting as his illustrations. Born in northern Michigan, he excelled at acrobatics as a child. His family moved to Virginia, Minnesota, at 12 and he soon had the neighbourhood gang putting on the “Jingling Brothers circus, complete with burlap-sack sidewalls.Read More →

  • Keith Haring (1958 – 1990) American artist and designer – art that danced

    Keith Haring Icons

    Keith Haring was best known for his graffiti-like painting, initially on the black paper used to cover discontinued billboard advertisements in the New York subway. After after a feverish 1980’s style career of surging popular success and grudging critical attention, Haring died of AIDS in 1991 at the age of 31.Read More →

  • Florence Koehler (1861 – 1944) American artist, craftsperson and designer

    Florence Koehler in studio featured image

    Florence Koehler was an American artist, craftsperson, designer, and jeweller, professionally active in Chicago, London and Rome. She was one of the best-known jewellers of the Arts and Crafts movement that flourished in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In Chicago, Koehler’s jewellery in a crafts style was fashionable in artistic circles. Koehler became one of the American crafts-revival leaders in jewellery, related more to French than English styles.Read More →

  • Charles Pfister (1938 – 1990) was an American interior and furniture designer

    Lobby, Grand Hotel, Washington DC 1987. Charles Pfister

    Charles Pfister (1939 to 1990) was an American interior and furniture designer and architect. He was professionally active in San Francisco.Read More →

  • Peter Shire (b.1947) American artist and designer

    Peter Shire featured image

    Shire was invited to join Ettore Sottsass’s Memphis project in 1981. He produced quirky, geometrically oriented furniture in Pop Art huRead More →

  • Candace Wheeler: The Art and Enterprise of American Design, 1875-1900

    Candace Wheeler cover art

    Candace Wheeler rose to prominence as the top late-nineteenth-century American textile designer by educating herself to match and eventually surpass the achievements of advanced European designers. She transitioned from needlework to fabric and interior design.Read More →

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