Valerie Wieselthier featured image

She was the head of the Wiener Werkstätte’s ceramic workshop. She worked in a highly distinctive style with coarse modelling and drip-glass effects. Read More →

Edmond Lachenal featured image

Lachenal joined Théodore Deck’s studio in 1870 and later became director. He established his studio in Malakoff, near Paris, in 1880 and Chatillon-sous-Bagneux, France, in 1887. He decorated his pottery with stylized figures, landscapes, greenery, and flowers in the ‘Persian style’ influenced by Deck. Read More →

Ruskin Pottery featured image

While it was prone to cynicism in the 20th century – for example, it was often pointed out that Morris’ handmade goods were too costly for anyone other than the wealthy he claimed to despise. However, through a fertile and now highly valued time of applied art, the Arts & Crafts wove a distinctive pattern.Read More →

Things of Beauty Growing cover artwork

British potters have revitalized traditional ceramic forms for nearly a century by creating or reinventing techniques, materials, and display methods. Things of Beauty Growing delves into the primary vessel typologies that have defined studio ceramics from the early twentieth century, such as bowls, vases, and chargers. Read More →

Christian Joachim featured image

Christian Joachim was a Danish Ceramicist (1870-1943). Between 1889 he studied at the Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, Copenhagen.

Between 1897 and 1900, Joachim made ceramics with George Jensen in a workshop outside Copenhagen. Between 1901 to 1933 worked for the Royal Copenhagen Porcelain Manufactory, where Arno Malinowski sometimes decorated his restrained neoclassical forms. Read More →

Émile Diffloth featured image

In 1899, he became artistic director of Kéramis, Belgian pottery owned by Boch Freres in La Louviere. In c1910, he moved to University City, Missouri, to work for Taxile Doat as a ceramics teacher at the School of Ceramic Art. He went back to France. He belonged to the Société des Artistes Françaises.Read More →

Anders Liljefors was a Swedish ceramicist. He initially concerned himself with household ware, discovered a new method of casting ceramics in a sand mould, and worked feverishly to extract new and unexpected effects from this material during the later years of his life.Read More →

Ernest Chaplet featured image

Ernest Chaplet (1835 – 1909) was a French ceramicist, an early studio potter’ who mastered slip decoration, rediscovered stoneware, and conducted copper-red studies. From 1882 to 1885, he was the director of Charles Haviland’s workshop to study decorative processes, where he collaborated with artists such as Paul Gauguin. He eventually moved to Choisy-le-Roi, where he focused on porcelain glaze studies.Read More →

Model by Charles John Noke featured image

He modelled vases (including Columbis and Diana) and figures from 1893 to 1898. (including Holbein and Rembrandt vases). With Cuthbert Bailey and John Slater, he experimented with the reproduction of Sung, Ming, and early Ch’ing dynasty blood-red rouge flambé and sang-de-boeuf glazes from the late 1890s to the early 1900sRead More →

Marblehead Pottery featured image

Herbert J. Hall founded the Marblehead Pottery in 1904 as one of several “handcraft shops” that offered occupational therapy to “nervously worn outpatients.” The shops specialised in hand-weaving, woodcarving, and metalwork, with pottery being the most popular.Read More →

William Bower Dalton ceramics

He was the principal of Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts from 1899 to 1919. He was the curator of the South London Art Gallery during and after this time. Dalton was just 31 years old when he arrived at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in 1899. He’d done well to land the position in such a competitive environment – there were 71 other candidates.Read More →