Taxile Maxmilien Doat (1851 – 1938) – French ceramicist

Taxile Doat featured image
Taxile Doat featured image.

Taxile Maxmilien Doat (1851 – 1938) was a French ceramicist. He was born in Albi, and he was active in University City, Missouri.

Biography

He started working at the Sevres factory in 1877. He designed a kiln in his home on rue Bagneaux in c1892 and studied porcelain clays and glazes until 1899.

He designed a wood kiln in Sevres and mixed stoneware and porcelain in one piece a year later.

Circa 1900, he produced crystalline and metallic glazes for gourd-shaped vases.

Researched Ceramics

His scientific research ‘Grand Feu Ceramics’ first appeared in the journal Keramic Studio and a 1905 book published by Keramic Studio Publishing Co, Syracuse, New York, with condensation in the 1906 and 1907 issues Art et Decoration.

United States

Doat was appointed to the position of director of the School of Ceramic Art. He was invited to create art pottery by the American Women’s League in 1909. By 1910, the first kiln in University City, Missouri, was operational. University City was once one of the most prosperous potteries in the United States. Doat returned to France after the establishment closed in 1915.

Exhibition

His work was shown at the ‘Exposition Universelle’ in Paris in 1900.

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing.

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