Amen Glasses – what are they?

Jacobite “Amen” glass, between 1720 and 1749 British, Glass; 7 × 3 7/16 in. (17.8 × 8.7 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Arthur A. Houghton Jr., 1941 (41.164) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/198869

‘Amen’ glasses gained their name from the Jacobite verses engraved on them, which invariably end with the word Amen. The verses vary in detail but are a distortion of ‘God save the King’. A typical example, in part, is:

God save the King I pray
God Bliss the King I pray
GOD SAVE THE KING
Send him Victorious
Happy & Glorious
Soon to Reign Over Us
God Save the King

God Bliss the Subjects All
And save both great and small
In ev’ry Station
That will bring home the King
Who has blest Right to Reign
It is the only thing
Can Save the Nation
Amen

Sources

Wills, G. (1976). A concise encyclopedia of Antiques.

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