Interaction of Color by Josef Albers illustration

Albers with “Interactions of Color,” made it his life work to translate the knowledge gained from existing theories and the results from his personal research into a practical course on the action and interaction of colour.Read More →

Futurism featured image

Futurism was an art movement consisting of painting, sculpture, and literature that flourished from 1909.  It was established by Italian, poet, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and inspired by Cubism.  Marinetti coined the term Futurism for the art movement that he founded.   He intended it as a celebration of modernity and a rejection of romance and sentiment, it was dedicated to modernity and speed, to the violent, the urban and the mechanical.Read More →

Zadik Zadikian featured image

He escaped the Soviet Union by swimming the Araks River in 1967. He lived in Istanbul and Beirut for a while. He moved to New York in 1974. Early on, his work resembled sculptural clay bits discovered in prehistoric investigations. His 1975 installation at P.S. 1 in Long Island City, New York, 1,000 Bricks Gilded in 22 Carat Gold Leaf, demonstrated a fascination in gold leaf, which he later employed on his furniture pieces.Read More →

Glasgow School of Art

“Glasgow School’ is a term used to describe several groups of artists based in Glasgow. The first and most significant of these groups was a loose association of artists active from around 1880 to the turn of the century; there was no formal membership or programme, but the artists involved (who prefered to be known as the Glasgow Boys) were united by a desire to move away from the conservative and parochial values they believed the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh represented. The group’s most well-known members were Sir James Guthrie (1859–1930) and Sir John Lavery. Several of them had lived and worked in France, and they were proponents of outdoor painting. The group’s heydey was gone by 1900, and it did not survive the First World War. Still, it offered a significant spur for Scottish art in the twentieth century, paving the way for the Scottish Colourists. From roughly 1890 through 1910, a slightly later group created a different style of Art Nouveau. Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the architect and designer, was its most significant member.Read More →

Louvre Abu Dhabi featured image

Since opening in 2017, the Louvre Abu Dhabi has welcomed over two million visitors from all over the world who have come to enjoy the Museum’s rich intercultural collection, eight cutting-edge international exhibitions and a range of cultural programs for people of all ages. READ MORERead More →

Hamburgers and Art

With The Burger Friday, the artist Gabriel Nardelli Araujo (previously featured) offers a very offbeat spin-off to his excellent series The Canvas Project. Accustomed to inserting Renaissance paintings into our reality, he now enjoys offering piles of burgers and fries to the characters of classical painting, bringing a large dose of saturated fats and junk food to the masterpieces of art history.Read More →

two fridas

Frida Kahlo was a Mexican artist that lived most of her life and physical pain, yet she continued to paint until her death, her artwork records her suffering and experiences as a woman. She was born to a Mexican mother and a German father.Read More →

Hilda surprised by a goat behind her by Duane Bryers

One of my favourite pinup artists was Minnesota born Duane Bryers, creator of the famous Hilda, a pleasingly, popular and plump pinup girl. Bryers’ background was as interesting as his illustrations. Born in northern Michigan, he excelled at acrobatics as a child. His family moved to Virginia, Minnesota, at 12 and he soon had the neighbourhood gang putting on the “Jingling Brothers circus, complete with burlap-sack sidewalls.Read More →

Yasoi Kusama featured image

In 1965, Kusama erected the first of her now-famous immersive environments. Infinity Mirror Room – Phalli’s Field (Floor Show) fused her interests in repetition, sexual exploration, psychology, and perception by filling a roughly 25-square-meter mirrored room with a thick carpet of soft, twisting phalluses camouflaged in the artist’s signature polka dots.Read More →

Keith Haring Icons

Keith Haring was best known for his graffiti-like painting, initially on the black paper used to cover discontinued billboard advertisements in the New York subway. After after a feverish 1980’s style career of surging popular success and grudging critical attention, Haring died of AIDS in 1991 at the age of 31.Read More →

Kelmscott Press

Morris believed his responsibility was “to revive a sense of beauty in home life, to restore the dignity of art to household decoration.Read More →

Michele De Lucchi featured image

At the Universita di Firenze, he experimented with new forms of art and film. In 1973, he created the Cavart group alongside Piero Brombin, Pier Paola Bortolami, Boris Pastrovicchio, and Valerio Tridenti, which was active in Architettura Radicale, filmmaking, written works, and happenings. Read More →

Hiroshi Awatsuji featured image

Hiroshi Awatsuji (1929- 1995) was a Japanese textile and graphic designer: born in Kyoto. He was considered the first Japanese textile designer to be recognised for contemporary design rather than for traditional art and craft. The main characteristic of his work was over sized motifs.Read More →

Christian Joachim featured image

Christian Joachim was a Danish Ceramicist (1870-1943). Between 1889 he studied at the Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi, Copenhagen.

Between 1897 and 1900, Joachim made ceramics with George Jensen in a workshop outside Copenhagen. Between 1901 to 1933 worked for the Royal Copenhagen Porcelain Manufactory, where Arno Malinowski sometimes decorated his restrained neoclassical forms. Read More →

Georgia O'Keeffe featured image

GEORGIA O’Keeffe, the acclaimed American painter and pioneer of modern art, lived long enough she was 98 when she died to see her work honoured as masterpieces in American museums. She continued to paint regularly well into her eighties until her eyesight began to fail, and she had to give up what she once called her “struggle to do justice to the feelings Nature inspires.”Read More →