Textile

Marion Dorn featured image

American textile designer Marion Dorn (1896โ€“1964) is best known for creating wall hangings, carpeting, and rugs, but she is also known to have created wallpaper, graphics, and illustrations.Read More →

Junichi Arai textile featured image

Junichi Arai (1932 – 2017) was a Japanese textile designer and producer born in Kiryu, Gunma. As the sixth generation of a mill-owning family, Arai grew up with fabrics being woven for obis and kimonos. He held traditional weaving methods in high regard and the skills that only the human hand can have in the art of fabric making. Read More →

Jacqueline Groag Textiles

Jacqueline Groag (1903 – 1986) was a Czech textile designer and ceramicist. Born in Prague she studied in Vienna at the Kunstgewerbeschule during the 1920s. In 1937 she moved to Paris where she designed dress prints for Jeanne Lanvin, Elsa Schiparelli and others.Read More →

Zandra Rhodes featured image

Zandra Rhodes studied lithography and printing at Medway College before going on to the Royal College of Art to study textiles, graduating in 1964 during the height of the pop movement. She made a paper wedding dress that cost less than two shillings, motivated by this trend and the work of painter Roy Lichtenstein in particular (about 7 new pence). In 1967, paper clothing was all the rage: it was the ultimate representation of disposable apparel.Read More →

Helen Abson

Helen Abson, who trained as an architect, is an Australian designer. She pursued architecture for five years; founded ZAB Design where she designed fabrics that exhibited a preoccupation for texture achieved through pattern and colour.Read More →

Margaret Leischner featured image

She began teaching weaving at the Bauhaus in 1931. She worked at the Dresdener Deutsche Werkstatten in 1931, designing woven textiles, and was the head of the weaving department at the Berlin Modeschule from 1932 to 1936. She worked as the head designer for Gateshead, a British fabric manufacturer.Read More →

Judith Leiber featured image

Judith Leiber (1921 – 2018) was a prolific designer whose fanciful minaudiรจres had accessorised royalties, first ladies, and film stars, and entered the collections of art the Metropolitan Museum of Art. While her couture handbagsโ€”carried by celebrities such as Greta Garbo, Elizabeth Taylor, Claudette Colbert, Bjรถrk, and Barbara Waltersโ€”are widely regarded as works of art, Leiber preferred the word “artisan” to “artist.”Read More →

Laura Ashley featured image

Laura Ashley was one of the first British designers to experiment with the concept of lifestyle marketing. Her romantic vision of nineteenth-century rural life, adapted to modern domestic realities, inspired a generation of middle-class Britons who returned to country life in the 1960s and 1970s.Read More →

Minnie Macleish British textile designer

She collaborated with Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Constance Irving at London’s Foxton textiles and Amsterdam’s Metz store. Macleish was a prolific designer during the 1920s and 1930s, creating patterns for Morton Sundour fabrics.Read More →

Masakzu Kobayashi preparing for exhibition

Masakazu Kobayashi studied at the University of Arts, Kyoto, Japan. He manifested traditional textile techniques and aesthetics in his work. Between 1966 and 1975, he worked as a textile designer for Kawashima. His 1982 fabric evoked komon, a textile dyeing technique which uses paper patterns with small motifs.Read More →

Hiroshi Awatsuji featured image

Hiroshi Awatsuji (1929- 1995) was a Japanese textile and graphic designer: born in Kyoto. He was considered the first Japanese textile designer to be recognised for contemporary design rather than for traditional art and craft. The main characteristic of his work was over sized motifs.Read More →

Gerhard Munthe featured image

Between 1877-82, he lived in Munich. As a pictorial artist, he brought about the break with historicism in Norway. Drawing on Norwegian folk art and poetry, he illustrated books and designed tapestries for firms including DNB (Det Norske Billedvaveri).Read More →

Tammis Keefe (1913โ€“1960) was an American textile designer. She designed everything from dish towels to glassware in her airy Dorothy Leibis Studio. Her work can be found at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Cooper Hewitt and the Fashion Institute of Technology.Read More →

Lucienne and Robin Day

Lucienne Day was one of the most influential post-war British textile designers. She developed a unique style of pattern making. READ MORERead More →

Gunnel Nyman glassware

Nyman worked for all the great Finnish glass manufacturers of the 20th century: Riihimaki from 1932โ€”47, Nuutajarvi-Notsjo from 1946โ€”48, and Karhula from 1935โ€”37 (and at littala from 1946โ€”47). She designed for both production and studio glass.Read More →

Group of Ten Swedish design collective

Because its members had previous careers in the textile industry, they wanted to be free to promote their creative ideas. Read More →

Wallpaper - featured image

Before 1840, nearly all the world’s wallpaper came from France, where it was hand-printed, using blocks and sheets of paper to produce a limited line of patterns. Making wallpaper by hand was a costly process, and only the very wealthy could afford to buy it.Read More →

Gertrud Preiswerk

Gertrud Preiswerk was a Swiss textile designer she was born in Basel. Between 1926 andRead More →

Alastair Morton textile

Morton joined his family’s Morton Sundour Fabrics in 1931 and oversaw the company’s first screen-printed fabrics. He was the artistic director and principal designer of Edinburgh Weavers in Carlisle, which was established in 1928 as Morton Sundour’s creative design unit from 1932 to 1935. From the 1930s, he was a supporter of the Modern movement, commissioning works from well-known painters and artists.Read More →

Female Pioneers, 1928/32 Art Institute, ChicagoOskar Petrovich Gryun

Oskar Petrovich Gryun (1874 – 1931) was a Russian Textile Designer. Education He studied atRead More →