British Designer ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง (Page 6)

“I am tired of good taste. I want to do everything wrong and get a result that is valid and of value as well.” Zandra Rhodes
Hermes, Gertrude- StoneHenge featured image

Gertrude Anna Bertha Hermes was born in Bickley, Kent, on August 18, 1901. Louis August Hermes and Helene, nรฉe Gerdes, were from Altena, Germany, near Dortmund. She attended the Beckenham School of Art in around 1921. She then enrolled in Leon Underwood’s Brook Green School of Painting and Sculpture in 1922, where she met Eileen Agar, Raymond Coxon, Henry Moore, and Blair Hughes-Stanton, whom she later married in 1926. They divorced in 1933 after separating in 1931.Read More →

Sinclair Microcomputer featured image

Sinclair ZX80 microcomputer, personal computer, plastic/metal / electrical components, made by Sinclair Computer Ltd, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, 1980. Sinclair ZX80 personal computer, or home computer, is a white plastic unit encasing a single printed circuit board. A small black keypad is located on the front of the unit. A QWERTY keyboard is formed by a black sheet of plastic printed in grey and red, with each key having various purposes.Read More →

David Gentleman - Postage Stamp

His subjects are paintings of landscapes, environmental posters and sketches of street life, and protest signs. He has written and illustrated several books, most of them are about countries and cities. He also produced several commemorative postage stamps for the United Kingdom.Read More →

Rodney Kinsman featured image

OMK Design is a British design group. It was established in 1966 by Rodney Kinsman, Jerzy Olejnik, Bryan Morrison. They all trained at the London Central School of Arts and Crafts. The group produced its furniture, including its 1969 T5 chair.Read More →

Milner Gray featured image

Gray was a fellow student and friend of artist-designer Graham Sutherland at Goldsmiths College School of Art, London University, where he studied painting and design. He served in the Royal Engineers during WWI when he was involved in camouflage work like other famous artists and designers from both wars. Read More →

Edwin Lutyens featured image

In 1887, he joined the firm George and Peto, where he met Herbert Baker, later becoming a colleague in New Delhi. Richard Norman Shaw and Philip Webb influenced him.Read More →

Charles Robert Ashbee featured image

His design philosophy also played a role in reconciling the principles of honesty of construction and appropriate use of materials with mechanised production. Read More →

Omar Ramsden featured image

He was a leading silverware designer and manufacturer in England. He lived on Fir Street in Walkley, Sheffield, Yorkshire but worked in London for most of his career.Read More →

Society of Industrial Arts Magazine Cover

The origins of the CSD lay in the creation in 1930 of the Society of Industrial Artists (SIA) in Britain, when the public debate was concerned with the nature and definition of both the designer and the design profession. Read More →

British Studio Pottery featured image

In Britain, the backlash against the highly ornamented machine-made ceramics that were fashionable in the late 1800s gathered steam. Art potteries were founded by a group of creative craftspeople who William Morris inspired.Read More →

Robo-Stacker recycled design

Robo-Stacker early example of the ‘Recycled Design’ Movement. Whirlpool washing machine drums were used to create general-purpose storage.Read More →

Hattie Stewart Doodlebombing featured image

Hattie Stewart is a London-based painter and illustrator. Her tongue-in-cheek artwork glides smoothly between various creative sectors, including Fashion, Music, and Contemporary Art, despite the fact that she is best known for โ€˜doodlebombing’ over influential Magazines.Read More →

Screenshot project page Neville Brody

Neville Brody rose to prominence during the early 1980s surge of “designerism”: a period when the British economy was considered to be expanding, marketing, promotion, and “cultural entrepreneurship” were in the air, and young culture was a money-spinner.Read More →

Pack Horse is a ‘active’ leisure chair that will accompany you on your mental journeys. A chair that allows you to become lost in analogue creative pursuits like writing, painting, reading, playing guitar, or listening to records. Read More →

Aestheticism Featured Image

Aestheticism describes the European art movement of the late 19th century. It is centred on the doctrine that art exists alone for the sake of its beauty and that it does not have to serve any political, didactic or another purpose.

Aestheticism is diametrically opposite to the moralist belief, the belief that moralism (and everything else) should be the handmaiden of art instead of art (and everything else) being the handmaiden of morality.Read More →

Eclipse Table Lamps

Eclipse Minimalist Lighting from Lee Broom. One of four new lighting collections to be launched during Salone del Mobile (2018). Read MORERead More →

Sigmund Pollitzer featured image

Sigmund Pollitzer (1913 – 1983) was a painter, decorative glass designer, and writer from the United Kingdom. He was born in the city of London.Read More →

Wedgwood Ceramics

He started by producing basic tableware, but by 1759, he had expanded to include beautiful items like classical vases and portrait busts. He was one of the first producers to hire artists to create product designs.Read More →

Index: abc | def | ghi | jkl | mno | pqr | stu | vwx | yz British CeramicistRead More →

William Morris Pillow / Cushion

In contrast to the 19th-century trend towards factory-produced textiles, William Morris (1834-1898), a founder of the British Arts and Crafts movement, strove to revive hand-made crafts’ reputation and technique, including textiles. Read More →