Hungarian designer

Chaise Lounge by Marcel Breuer

Marcel Breuer designed this chaise lounge during his influential period in England (1935-37). His work for the London-based design and architectural firm Isokon is the most recognizable of this period. The chaise was designed for the 1936 Seven Architects Exhibition for Heal & Sons Department Store.Read More →

Pierre Vago Sketch featured image

Pierre Vago was a Hungarian Architect and designer. He studied at the École Spéciale d’Architecture, Paris.

He settled in France in 1928, where he was editor-in-chief on three issues of the review L’Architecture d’aujourd’hui. After World War 2, he was active in reviving the journal and set up his architecture office. In 1948 he left the journal, and it was in 1948 that he became a member of UAM (Union des Artistes Modernes). He built the Basicila de Saint-Pi X (with architect Pierre Pinsard and engineer Eugéne Freysinnet) in Lourdes.Read More →

Gustave Miklos sculpture featured image

In the French army during World War I, he discovered the art of Greece and Byzantium. In Paris after the war, he met Jacques Doucet, for whom he designed silverware, enamels, tapestries and carpets for the residence on the avenue du Bois (today avenue Foch). In c1923 he turned to sculpture and completed commissions for Doucet and others in a Cubist style.Read More →

MoMA Wassily Chair featured image

He attended the Vienna Akademie der bildenden Künste in 1920 and the Bauhaus in Weimar from 1920 to 1924. In 1920, he moved to Vienna, intending to become a painter and sculptor. However, he left the Akademie der bildenden Kunste because he was displeased with it, and he enrolled at the Bauhaus in Weimar, where he became one of its most well-known students. Read More →

Paul Kiss Metal Worker

Paul Kiss was Hungarian metalworker he was born Belabalva (now Romania). He was professionally active in Paris. Read More →

The New Bauhaus featured image

The revolutionary German art school known as the Bauhaus (1919-1933) was unique for its time in the way its curriculum combined the applied and fine arts, teaching students to create works that could satisfy both form and function. Read More →

Featured Image by László Moholy-Nagy (MoMA)

In Budapest, he studied law, while elsewhere, he studied sketching and painting. During World War I, he began drawing and became interested in Kasimir Malevich and El Lissitzky. Read More →

Eva Zeisel ceramics featured image

Eva Zeisel (1906 – 2011) was a Hungarian designer and ceramicist. She was born in Budapest. She was professionally active in Germany, Russia, Austria, and the USA. She settled in the United States in 1938.Read More →