Hungarian designer

The New Bauhaus featured image

The revolutionary German art school known as the Bauhaus (1919-1933) was unique for its time in the way its curriculum combined the applied and fine arts, teaching students to create works that could satisfy both form and function. Read More →

MoMA Wassily Chair featured image

He attended the Vienna Akademie der bildenden Künste in 1920 and the Bauhaus in Weimar from 1920 to 1924. In 1920, he moved to Vienna, intending to become a painter and sculptor. However, he left the Akademie der bildenden Kunste because he was displeased with it, and he enrolled at the Bauhaus in Weimar, where he became one of its most well-known students. Read More →

Pierre Vago Sketch featured image

Pierre Vago was a Hungarian Architect and designer. He studied at the École Spéciale d’Architecture, Paris.

He settled in France in 1928, where he was editor-in-chief on three issues of the review L’Architecture d’aujourd’hui. After World War 2, he was active in reviving the journal and set up his architecture office. In 1948 he left the journal, and it was in 1948 that he became a member of UAM (Union des Artistes Modernes). He built the Basicila de Saint-Pi X (with architect Pierre Pinsard and engineer Eugéne Freysinnet) in Lourdes.Read More →