Lucienne and Robin Day

Lucienne Day was one of the most influential post-war British textile designers. She developed a unique style of pattern making. READ MORERead More →

Marie Teinitzerová featured image

Marie Teinitzerov├í was born in a little town near Pelhimov called kov. However, she and her parents soon relocated to Jindichv Hradec. In Vienna and Brno, she studied painting. She attended the School of Applied Arts in Prague from 1905 to 1906, then a weaving school in Berlin in 1906. Her research tour took her to Denmark, Sweden, and France, where she attended tapestry workshops in Paris. She returned to Prague in 1908.Read More →

Hiroshi Awatsuji featured image

Hiroshi Awatsuji (1929- 1995) was a Japanese textile and graphic designer: born in Kyoto. He was considered the first Japanese textile designer to be recognised for contemporary design rather than for traditional art and craft. The main characteristic of his work was over sized motifs.Read More →

Margaret Leischner featured image

She began teaching weaving at the Bauhaus in 1931. She worked at the Dresdener Deutsche Werkstatten in 1931, designing woven textiles, and was the head of the weaving department at the Berlin Modeschule from 1932 to 1936. She worked as the head designer for Gateshead, a British fabric manufacturer.Read More →

Laura Ashley featured image

Laura Ashley was one of the first British designers to experiment with the concept of lifestyle marketing. Her romantic vision of nineteenth-century rural life, adapted to modern domestic realities, inspired a generation of middle-class Britons who returned to country life in the 1960s and 1970s.Read More →

Masakzu Kobayashi preparing for exhibition

Masakazu Kobayashi is a Japanese textile designer. He studied at the University of Arts, Kyoto, Japan. Between 1966 and 1975, he worked as a textile designer for Kawashima. He manifested traditional textile techniques and aesthetics in his work. He developed both production fabrics and large-scale fibre works.Read More →

Sven Markelius Chairs

Sven Markeilus (1889- 1972) was a Swedish Architect, Town Planner and textile designer born in Stockholm.

He taught in Stockholm and at Yale University. In the 1950s, Markelius designed simple wooden furniture and printed fabrics with Astrid Sampe, produced by Nordiska in Stockholm.Read More →

Robert Yorke Goodden featured image

He was in private practice since 1932. Wallpapers, domestic machine-pressed glassware for Chance Bros., 1953 coronation hangings for Westminster Abbey, gold and silverwares, ceremonial metalwork, glassware for King’s College, Cambridge, 1961 metal-foil murals for the oceanliner Canberra, engraved and sandblasted glass murals for Pilkington. Read More →

Alastair Morton textile featured image

Morton joined his family’s Morton Sundour Fabrics in 1931 and oversaw the company’s first screen-printed fabrics. He was the artistic director and principal designer of Edinburgh Weavers in Carlisle, which was established in 1928 as Morton Sundour’s creative design unit from 1932 to 1935. From the 1930s, he was a supporter of the Modern movement, commissioning works from well-known painters and artists.Read More →

Ray Komai Masks

Ray Komai was a Japanese American; he was a graphic, industrial and interior designer. He studied in Los Angeles at the Art Center College.

He settled in New York in 1944, where he worked in advertising and set up a graphic design and advertising office (with Carter Winter). J.G. Furniture created Komai’s 1949 moulded plywood chair with a split seat and bent metal legs. They produced his other designs of chairs, tables and upholstered seating as well.Read More →

Junichi Arai textile featured image

Junichi Arai (1932 – 2017) was a Japanese textile designer and producer born in Kiryu, Gunma. As the sixth generation of a mill-owning family, Arai grew up with fabrics being woven for obis and kimonos. He held traditional weaving methods in high regard and the skills that only the human hand can have in the art of fabric making. Read More →