Just in time concept - an image of a analogue stopwatch
Just in time concept – an image of a analogue stopwatch

“Just in time” design concept, this practice became an increasingly important aspect of economic manufacturing and distribution. The ability to link sales data from retail outlets and checkout terminals with centralised corporate manufacturing and distribution systems ‘just in time’ eliminated the need for manufacturer-retailers like Benetton, an Italian clothing company, to keep large amounts of stock on hand (thus wasting valuable space). In the widespread drive to increase efficiency in a highly competitive market place, such companies took full advantage of the manufacturing possibilities afforded by ComputerAided Manufacture (CAM), and this ‘just in time’ tailoring of production to retail outlet allowed for economic smallscale production runs that were closely linked to changing and sometimes volatile consumer demands.

Sources

Woodham, J. M. (2006). A dictionary of modern design. Oxford University Press.

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