Regency Tankard – Intricate Low Relief

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A Silver Regency Tankard

A Silver Regency Tankard

Regency tankard. A type of Tankard made in England during the Regency, 1811–20, having very elaborate ornamentation in the form of low-relief figures around the body and on the handle.

Tankards have been used for centuries as drinking vessels, and the Regency era in England saw the creation of some of the most ornate and elaborate tankards ever made. The tankards from this period were characterised by their intricate low-relief figures adorning the body and handle. These figures often depict scenes from mythology or history, adding to the tankard’s overall aesthetic appeal.

The craftsmanship of these tankards was unparalleled, with each piece meticulously crafted by skilled artisans. Today, these Regency-era tankards are highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts, representing a unique piece of history and artistry. Whether used for display or enjoying a cold beer, a Regency-era tankard will surely be a conversation starter and a treasured addition to any collection. (Newman, 1987)

Sources

Byars, M., & Riley, T. (2004). The design encyclopedia. Laurence King Publishing. https://amzn.to/3ElmSlL

Newman, H. (1987, November 1). An Illustrated Dictionary of Silverware. https://doi.org/10.1604/9780500234563

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